Imagine Dragons And Hard Rock Donate To Casey Cares Foundation‏

first_imgEarlier this week, Imagine Dragons, the Las Vegas-based alternative rock band behind the hit single “Radioactive,” performed a private concert at the newly revamped Hard Rock Cafe Baltimore.Imagine Dragons band members, left to right, Daniel Platzman, Dan Reynolds, Wayne Sermon and Ben Mckee are presented the RIAA Gold & Platinum career award by RIAA’s Liz KennedyCredit/Copyright: Hard Rock International/ Larry French/Invision for AP ImagesTo celebrate the grand reopening, Hard Rock opened the updated cafe with a guitar smash and a star-studded red carpet ceremony featuring Imagine Dragons, local athletes, celebrities, actors and more!Fred Thimm, Vice President of Hard Rock International, Casey Baynes, Founder of the Casey Cares Foundation, and Hamish Dodds, President and CEO of Hard Rock International present a $10,000 donation to The Casey Cares FoundationCredit/Copyright: Hard Rock International/ Larry French/Invision for AP ImagesTo honor Hard Rock’s “Love All – Serve All” motto, the event benefited the Casey Cares Foundation, an organization whose mission is to provide uplifting programs throughout Baltimore and the Mid-Atlantic Region with a special focus on critically ill children and their families.Imagine Dragons perform at the Grand Reopening party of Hard Rock Cafe Baltimore on Tuesday, October 1, 2013.Credit/Copyright: Hard Rock International/ Larry French/Invision for AP Imageslast_img read more

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Bill Clinton And President Obama Pay Tribute To Maya Angelou

first_imgBill Clinton has commented on the legacy of poet, author and activist Maya Angelou, who passed away today.“With Maya Angelou’s passing, America has lost a national treasure; and Hillary and I, a beloved friend,” said Clinton. “The poems and stories she wrote and read to us in her commanding voice were gifts of wisdom and wit, courage and grace.“I will always be grateful for her electrifying reading of “On the Pulse of Morning” at my first inaugural, and even more for all the years of friendship that followed. Now she sings the songs the Creator gave to her when the river “and the tree and the stone were one.”“Our deepest sympathies are with Guy and his family.”President Obama also released a statement:“When her friend Nelson Mandela passed away last year, Maya Angelou wrote that “No sun outlasts its sunset, but will rise again, and bring the dawn.”“Today, Michelle and I join millions around the world in remembering one of the brightest lights of our time – a brilliant writer, a fierce friend, and a truly phenomenal woman. Over the course of her remarkable life, Maya was many things – an author, poet, civil rights activist, playwright, actress, director, composer, singer and dancer. But above all, she was a storyteller – and her greatest stories were true. A childhood of suffering and abuse actually drove her to stop speaking – but the voice she found helped generations of Americans find their rainbow amidst the clouds, and inspired the rest of us to be our best selves. In fact, she inspired my own mother to name my sister Maya.“Like so many others, Michelle and I will always cherish the time we were privileged to spend with Maya. With a kind word and a strong embrace, she had the ability to remind us that we are all God’s children; that we all have something to offer. And while Maya’s day may be done, we take comfort in knowing that her song will continue, “flung up to heaven” – and we celebrate the dawn that Maya Angelou helped bring.”Michelle Obama added:“Maya Angelou teaches us that it’s not enough merely to seek greatness for ourselves. We must help others discover the greatness within themselves. We need to reach down and reach out, and give back, and lift others the way Maya has lifted us.“That is how we can most truly honor our friend Maya Angelou – by how we live our lives … by striving every day to embody the wisdom, and generosity, and radiant love with which she has graced our world.”Perhaps best known for her memoir I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou was presented the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2010. In 1993, she became the first poet to recite a poem at a Presidential Inauguration since Robert Frost in 1961.last_img read more

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International Rescue Committee Hosts NY Fashion Week PopUp

first_imgInternational Rescue Committee (IRC) today announced it will present the IRC at New York Fashion Week Pop-Up at The Empire Hotel (44 West 63rd Street) on February 13 and 14, 2015.IRC Spokesperson and critically-acclaimed Chef Marco Canora (Brodo and Hearth Restaurant) will serve his celebrated Bone Broth, the latest health craze to sweep the nation. The Pop-Up will also feature a photo exhibition with Sudanese Model and IRC Voice Nykhor Paul of images from her recent trip to Ethiopia.The Pop-Up will be open from 11am to 5pm and is open by invitation only.Chef Canora supports the New Roots program, an essential part of the IRC’s broader efforts to help refugees resettled in the United States. The New Roots program enables refugees to establish community gardens to grow food for themselves and their neighbors, as well as offers nutrition and agribusiness training. Chef Canora has earned critical acclaim for his Italian-inflected cooking. In 2003, he opened Hearth in the East Village, which has since received a prestigious “Outstanding Restaurant” nomination from the James Beard Foundation. He is also the founder of Brodo, a popular to-go window operating out of Hearth serving cups of hot, nourishing bone broths.Nykhor Paul joined the IRC Voices last year after a trip in August 2014 to the Gambella region of Ethiopia where thousands of South Sudanese refugees live. In one of the camps she visited, she reunited with her parents for the first time in 16 years. The IRC provides refugee camps in the Gambella region with water, sanitation and health care and other support services.The IRC @NYFW pop-up is made possible with the generous support of the GE Foundation, Threads 4 Thought and Whole Foods Market.An ongoing and dedicated supporter of the IRC’s work, the GE Foundation is spotlighting Ebola relief efforts. From 5-7pm following the regular pop-up hours on Friday, February 13th, GE Foundation’s partner, Jhpiego, a global health non-profit and affiliate of Johns Hopkins University, will showcase an advanced protective suit for healthcare workers who treat Ebola patients. Influenced by fashion design, the innovative suit is being developed by Jhpiego and the Johns Hopkins’ Center for Bio-Engineering Innovation & Design (CBID). Jill Andrews of Jill Andrews Gowns, advised on the suit design and will also participate in the event.Sustainable fashion apparel company, Threads 4 Thought, will donate $5 for every Instagram and Twitter post with #IRCatNYFW during the pop-up, to help raise awareness and support for the IRC’s global work.Whole Foods Market NYC is supporting the Pop-Up with the highest-quality ingredients for Chef Canora’s Bone Broth. Whole Foods Market is proud to partner with the IRC through the Whole Planet Foundation to help alleviate poverty around the globe.last_img read more

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Jim Davis And Garfield Help Shelter Pet Project

first_imgThe Humane Society of the United States’ All Animals Magazine has featured an interview with Garfield creator Jim Davis about his support of the Shelter Pet Project, a public service ad campaign focused on spreading the word that pets in shelters are wonderful and lovable, and encouraging potential adopters to consider the shelter as the first place to look when acquiring a “new best friend.”Garfield Joins Shelter Pet ProjectIn the interview – by James Hettinger of Animal Sheltering magazine – Jim Davis talks about how he hopes Garfield can help end animal homelessness.How did you decide to get Garfield and Odie involved in the Shelter Pet Project?It was such a perfect fit for the characters. Both Garfield and Odie were abandoned by their owners — Garfield was left to fend for himself in an Italian restaurant before he was eventually adopted by Jon Arbuckle, and Odie was left behind by his owner, Jon’s former roommate, Lyman. (There are various theories on what became of Lyman.) The characters have enjoyed all the comforts of home, and they hope to help their fellow pets enjoy the same.What do you think the characters can offer to help the cause?Because they’re animated and colorful, they can capture the audience’s attention. Because they’re funny, they can deliver an important message with a bit of humor. And because they’re pets, they can relate to the plight of the shelter pet.To read the full interview, click here.last_img read more

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Who Can Relate Glenn Close Supports New Mental Health Awareness Campaign

first_imgOUTFRONT Media Inc. announced today a campaign in collaboration with the University of Michigan Counseling and Psychological Services, the Steven Schwartzberg Foundation, LOGIC, Glenn Close, and Michi and Brandon Marshall, that raises awareness about mental health and leads up to a week-long series of events, called “Who Can Relate?” that will further drive conversation about the cause.You Are Not Alone BillboardThe out-of-home (OOH) campaign promotes “Who Can Relate?” a weeklong campus event at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor campus. It is aimed at educating the public and fighting the stigma that often accompanies conversations about mental health, to show those suffering that they are not alone. The event will include a series of mental health events and discussions on campus and conclude with a performance by Logic on March 30, 2018 at Hill Auditorium.The campaign – live in Detroit, Ann Arbor, New York City and Los Angeles through March 30, 2018 – features creative developed by OUTFRONT Studios, OUTFRONT’s in-house full-service creative boutique, that illustrates the thoughts and feelings many people facing mental health challenges experience. A blurred image of LOGIC is surrounded by words depicting the internal thoughts of an individual engaged in a mental health struggle. Most prominently displayed is the phrase “You Are Not Alone.” Teasers of the campaign, featuring everyday individuals, ran from February 27, 2018 to March 4, 2018.“OUTFRONT Media is proud to work with a group that values the importance of active discussions, through numerous platforms, about tough topics like mental health,” said Eddy Herty, National Creative Director at OUTFRONT Media. “We believe that everyone has the responsibility to be a part of this conversation and to reinforce the support systems available to those affected.”The media platform is able to connect to the masses, reaching millions of people daily, but in a way that is localized and feels close to home. It is the ideal medium for promoting “social good” messages. It is uniquely suited to deliver both “lean back” and “lean in” creative that can highlight a message while encouraging action through an omnichannel approach. As a leader in OOH, OUTFRONT feels a strong sense of responsibility to put its properties and creative ingenuity to work. OUTFRONT Media is proud to be a part of the solution by enriching the lives of individuals facing mental health challenges, letting them know they are not alone.“Glenn, Brandon and Michi have been warriors in the fight against the stigma surrounding mental health. We are all thankful that Logic has bravely committed his time, talent and platform to help those who continue to suffer. OUTFRONT Media has been a passionate partner and has shown a commitment to helping to address these important social issues,” said Harris Schwartzberg from the Steven Schwartzberg Foundation.To learn more, visit: • University of Michigan Counseling and Psychological Services • Who Can Relate? • Project375 • Bring Change to Mindlast_img read more

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How to hide a celebrity at the Toronto International Film Festival

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Red carpets, after-parties and onstage screening appearances are when the famous are working at the festival. Otherwise, they’re off the clock and, at least for some, trying to stay out of sight.1. The ‘other’ Pearson airport The game of hide-and-seek begins as soon as they land in Toronto. Big stars tend to arrive via private plane.You may have noticed the huge Skyservice Business Aviation building across from the main terminals as your plane taxis at Pearson International Airport. The other half ends up here if they’re coming or going by charter jet.The 31-year-old Canadian company has what’s known as a fixed base operation, or FBO, at Pearson. It includes a sizable “luxury” private lounge with a wall of windows overlooking the runways.This private mini-terminal is open 24/7 for guests to shower, nap, or have a pre-arranged meal, from a fast-food burger to a gourmet feast. A 24-hour concierge is available to look after requests.“TIFF is our Christmas,” says Catherine Vettese, Skyservice manager of marketing and communications. “It is absolutely by far our busiest time of the year in Toronto. At any time of day you will see row after row of private jets parked.” Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Advertisement They’re the centre of attention at the Toronto International Film Festival — unless they don’t want to be.So just how do you hide a movie star?It’s a challenge, a bit like smuggling an elephant into a room underneath a washcloth. But there are ways. A limo to the stairs of a private jet, a brisk hustle through a hotel kitchen or ducking in through an inconspicuous entrance can be a celebrity’s best friend. Facebook Login/Register With:last_img read more

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Cree Quebec deal maintains balance between past future Coon Come

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Crees in Quebec are in the process of creating a new model of governance.It’s one that will give them power in their territories.APTN National News reporter Danielle Rochette has this story.last_img

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RCMP seeks publics help after unusual Iqaluit assault

first_imgAPTN National NewsNunavut RCMP is asking for the public’s help to identify a man who assaulted a woman at Iqaluit’s Kicking Caribou pub on January 27.APTN National News reporter Kent Driscoll finds that even with Nunavut’s elevated crime levels, the assault was unusual for the territory.last_img

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Manitobas child welfare system in crisis and needs immediate action

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe brutal death of a five-year-old Manitoba girl, and the inquiry that followed, was supposed to lead to changes that could help save another child’s life.Phoenix Sinclair was murdered by her mother and her boyfriend in 2005. She had just been returned to her mother after being in and out of Manitoba’s child welfare system from birth.Earlier this year, the province apologized for the system’s failure to protect the young girl.Thursday, they faced more criticism.APTN’s Dennis Ward has the latest.last_img read more

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Thousands march in Ottawa for climate solutions and climate justice

first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA – Without Mother Earth there is no life.That was the message in Ottawa where thousands gathered – joining many more across the world – in what was to be an international day of action on climate change Sunday on the eve of the United Nations climate summit in Paris, France.“We stand together today for one important reason and that is to save, to protect and respect Mother Earth and the water,” Claudette Commanda told the large crowd in front of City Hall on Laurier Street. “For without Mother Earth, who is the mother for all people, we do not have life.”The list of speakers also included the likes of environmental activist David Suzuki.The purpose of the gathering was to urge Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his new government to get Canada 100 per cent reliable on renewable energy like wind, solar and hydro. They also called for the end of investing in fossil fuels.Trudeau is in Paris to take part in the international summit on climate change, along with his cabinet ministers and Canada’s premiers. Assembly of First Nations Perry Bellegarde is there, as well, along with other Indigenous people representing the grassroots.Many marchers in Ottawa wore green to represent renewable energy with hundreds busing in from out of town on what was a cold and cloudy Sunday afternoon.The march stretched to nearly a kilometre beginning at City Hall with organizers estimating 25,000 making their way up Elgin Street, pausing for a minute of silence at the National War Memorial, down to Sussex Drive and looping around United States embassy before making their way to Parliament Hill.OFFICIAL COUNT: 25,000 MARCH IN #OTTAWA! Thank you to everyone who came! #100possible #climatemarch pic.twitter.com/ORw8IOeduT— 100 Percent Possible (@100possibleca) November 29, 2015Georgie Horton-Baptiste came from the Peterborough, Ont. area and said she did so for those who couldn’t. Police shutdown roads for marchers and there didn’t appear to be any incidents, unlike in Paris.VIDEO: Police fire tear gas at hundreds in Paris demonstrating against France’s ban on protests. #COP21 pic.twitter.com/crORJVy1El— Democracy Now! (@democracynow) November 29, 2015Meanwhile, in Vancouver demonstrators added heir voices to a crescendo around the world demanding swift and concrete climate-change action from world leaders gathered in Paris for the United Nations climate talks.Thousands of people packed the shaded square outside the Vancouver Art Gallery on a sunny Sunday afternoon before marching through the city’s downtown core.“What you’re seeing here today is a massive display of community spirit,” said Ruth Walmsley on Sunday, a Vancouver Quaker and one of the event’s organizers.“We’re here to send a very loud and clear message that we need immediate and meaningful action to be taken to address the climate crisis.”Those demands include an end to subsidies for fossil fuels and large-scale investment in renewable energy, she said.“This is the 21st conference of the climate summits and we have yet to see the kind of action that we really need to address the crisis that we’re in,” Walmsley added.“Honestly, I think that the only way that change is going to happen is if enough people take to the streets and demand it.”The event attracted an assortment of attendees advocating a smorgasbord of different causes, from combating open-pen fish farms to endorsing alternative energy, and from supporting protection for endangered species to opposing pipeline expansion.The event was co-ordinated by a network of more than 70 organizations from across the Lower Mainland, including First Nations, faith groups and environmental associations.Squamish First Nation Chief Ian Campbell stressed the need to work together in the battle against climate change.“Bringing in traditional Indigenous views into that discussion I think is important for the values that First Nations bring around stewardship of the land and long-term planning around resource extraction and development.”Speaking from Paris, Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson echoed the importance of citizen engagement in a message to the crowds assembled in his city and across the country.“Keep your voices strong and make sure we hold all levels of government accountable to taking action on climate change,” he said.“We’re seeing real leadership at a grassroots level and a business level that needs to be enabled by government.”– with files from The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Ottawa high school students send reminder to Attawapiskat youth theyre not forgotten

first_imgAnnette Francis APTN National NewsSome Ottawa-area high school students are preparing to ship a care-package 1,000 kilometres north.The special package is the students’ response to a First Nation community in crisis.last_img

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Retired RCMP officer speaking out about police shooting death of Craig McDougall

first_imgDennis Ward APTN National NewsA retired senior police officer is speaking out about the shooting death of an Indigenous man.An inquest into the death of Craig McDougall was supposed to start on Monday – eight years after he was shot by Winnipeg police.But the hearings are on hold after a witness changed their testimony.Today, a retired police officer who was hired by the family to look into the shooting sat down with APTN.dward@aptn.calast_img

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New York activist injured at Standing Rock visits Alton Gas protest site

first_imgTrina Roache APTN National NewsAn activist who was badly injured during a skirmish between water protectors and security forces in North Dakota is in Nova Scotia.Sophia Wilansky is talking to protestors at the site of a gas storage facility along the shores of the Shubenacadie River.troache@aptn.calast_img

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New exhibit in Manitoba commemorates tragic Metis history that needs to be

first_imgBrittany HobsonAPTN NewsA new exhibit chronicling a tragic and historic time in Metis history has opened at the Manitoba Museum in Winnipeg. Ni Kishkishin, meaning I Remember, retells the story of Ste. Madeleine, a former Metis settlement located along the Manitoba, Saskatchewan border.In 1939, nearly 300 people living in the community were displaced when provincial and municipal governments designated the land for community pastures as part of what was called the Prairie farm rehabilitation administration.During the unveiling of the exhibit Metis Elder George Fleury shared stories of his childhood.He recalled the tragic moment his family returned home from working various jobs.“Our house had been burned down while we were gone,” said Fleury. “I was only four-years-old but I remember seeing my mother crying and my father’s shoulders heaving up and down.“He was crying too.”Government came into Ste. Madeleine and burned down the homes as well as their dogs were shot dead.Fleury says he was too young to understand the full impact of what this meant for his parents.“I didn’t sense what the loss was but in their hearts they knew what had been lost,” he said.“They lost their homes, their livelihood, their dignity.”The exhibit is displayed in Michif, French and English. It includes artifacts and stories from Elders, including Fleury.All that’s left of the settlement today is a cemetery.“Ste. Madeleine is a piece of history that needs to be corrected,” said John Fleury, son of George and a minister with the Manitoba Metis Federation.The organization continues to fight with governments to have the land returned.“When you talk about reconciliation, well come on Manitoba step up to the plate and let’s do some reconciling,” said the younger Fleury.bhobson@aptn.ca@bhobs22last_img read more

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Nova Scotia rocket launch site hopes to eventually reach 12 launches per

first_imgHALIFAX – The developers of Canada’s only commercial spaceport are shooting for as many as a dozen rockets to blast off per year from a proposed site near a small community on Nova Scotia’s eastern shore.Proponents of the project gathered in a Halifax boardroom on Monday to plan the next steps, which will rely first on the province approving an environmental assessment plan early next year.Stephen Matier, president of Maritime Launch Services Ltd., was in an upbeat mood following the meeting, saying the group is expecting to be building in May 2018.“With a launch date of 2020, and 18 months of construction and six months of commissioning, you can see where we’ve got to get to groundbreaking. So this is an important and key time for us,” said the executive, who represents a consortium of three U.S.-based space firms.He presented rocket designers and executives from Ukrainian-based Yuzhnoye Design with a case of Rocket Lager craft beer — recently created in Guysborough County by a craft brewer and featuring an astronaut on its label.The project doesn’t plan to put humans into space, but is rather squarely aimed at attracting consortiums of firms that want to put satellites into orbit for commercial purposes such as near-Earth imaging and global Internet broadband services.“Why are we doing this? There’s a huge market out there for satellites to get put into space and there’s a real lack of launch capability to be able to do that,” said Matier.He said the first round of satellite launches his firm is aiming for begins in 2021 and 2022, and the initial goal for the company would be one to three launches a year, with a near-term goal of eight launches annually.Maksym Degtiarov, a rocket design executive with Yuzhnoye State Design Office, was on hand for the news conference to say the Ukrainian firm is prepared to ramp up its production of Cyclone-4M medium-lift rockets to supply the site.“We expect it to happen up to 12 times a year. From six to 12 times a year,” he said. Matier added the firm is capable of producing about one of the rockets every 29 days.Degtiarov said each launch would take up to two minutes and from three kilometres away would sound no louder than a commercial aircraft.It’s estimated the rocket will move over 20,000 metres through the sky within 105 seconds, with the public able to view the spectacle from vantage points at Little Dover, N.S., about eight kilometres south of Canso, said Matier.Yuzhnoye State Design Office is the rocket design company that works under the State Space Agency of Ukraine but operates commercially. A second firm, Yuzhmash, is a manufacturing company and operates the same way and builds what Yuzhnoye designs.Overall, the project is a private-sector venture, but will require the province’s environmental approvals and further regulatory approvals for launching procedures.Matier said his firm will want satellite launch customers to begin putting forward downpayments by the beginning of next year for the preparation of their rockets and the launching costs.“There’s an 18-month schedule ahead of the launch date where they need to start making some of these downpayments and that will accrue in an escrow (account) as we’re moving forward,” explained.“Financing continues. It’s that kind of project. You’re always building your financial structure,” he said.Follow (at)mtuttoncporg on Twitter.last_img read more

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The flawed absent minded overconfident thinking economists see in all of us

first_imgCALGARY – Humans are pretty complicated creatures — but that hasn’t always been reflected in the influential field of economics.Economic models based on assumptions we are fully emotionless have, however, given way in recent decades to a more nuanced view of our quirks and imperfections, ushering in the rise of behavioural economics.Richard Thaler, a pioneer in the field who was awarded the Nobel economics prize this year for his efforts, said in his acceptance speech that his work has focused on how to introduce humans into economic theory as the fallible, absent minded, procrastinating, and notoriously over-confident people we can be.The Canadian Press canvassed some of Canada’s prominent economists to find out where they see some of the biggest disconnects between the rational-thinking optimizers of traditional economics and the world in which we all actually live.Too little time, too little value:Jim Stanford, former Unifor economist and author of Economics for Everyone, says one of our big oversights is not putting enough value on time itself.“People undervalue their own time, on the assumption that time doesn’t have any visible value directly attached to it…But, of course, the older we get, we realize time is the most valuable thing there is.”He says that flaw comes up in everything from a willingness to walk long distances for cheaper parking, to not factoring in how long it can take to assemble Ikea furniture.And when people don’t value time enough, it makes it easier for companies and governments to take more of it for free, whether it’s being stuck on hold, working unpaid overtime, or the increasing need to wait for jobs in the gig economy, he adds.“The fact that time seems to be free leads to real inefficiencies in how we organize things in the economy.”One-track minds:Trevor Tombe, an economist at the University of Calgary, says that he sees many of the flaws identified in behavioural economics play out in public policy debates.One of the key issues he sees is confirmation bias, in which people seek out and interpret information that is consistent with their own prior views, which has only been made worse by social media and other tools to screen out dissenting opinions.He says the false consensus effect is also at play. This includes when people tend to think their own views are much more widely held than they truly are.“That’s in part, what leads the debates in the political arena or about policy to be highly polarized.”FOMO:Doug Porter, chief economist at BMO Financial Group, says he’s been struck by how much people pay attention to saving dollars and even pennies on smaller purchases, but have been willing to increase home price bids by tens of thousands of dollars to get in the market.He says the fear of missing out was well on display in the Toronto real estate market this year, despite rising concerns of a bubble.Porter says there are shifts that can indeed change market fundamentals — and it’s difficult to know you’re in a bubble when you’re in the middle of it — but he said people should be careful when buying into a market that seems to be going up on speculation alone.“Where you have to be cautious is when people are buying because they think prices only have one way to go. They’re buying simply because things are going up, not because things have fundamentally shifted.”Boredom and bad decisions:Craig Alexander, chief economist at the Conference Board of Canada, gets frustrated when people spend far more time on research on small consumer purchases like televisions than on far more important financial decisions.He sees the same pattern play out in deciding on retirement savings, buying insurance, and other economic decisions that can be intimidating (and possibly quite dull).“Some people find finance scary. There’s a language to it — they don’t understand the language, they’re uncomfortable with it, so they avoid it. And it’s a natural tendency, but it can lead people to making poor choices.”He says behavioural economics has helped, by “nudging” people to make better decisions like having people enrolled in pension programs by default, but not taking away their free choice by being allowed to opt out.Under pressure:Frances Woolley, an economics professor at Carleton University, sees all sorts of behavioural quirks in tipping.Even the suggestion of a 15 to 25 per cent tip on a machine leads people to believe its the reasonable amount, says Woolley, an example of the so-called anchor effect that behavioural economics identifies as relying too heavily on the first piece of information offered.The field also explains that people will do something like tipping just because other people are already doing it, she says.But as an economist she’s still puzzled by a tipping culture that can see a server at a high-end restaurant earning more than, say, a child care worker.“Do we really need smart and entrepreneurial people working as servers in high-end restaurants — because that’s what we’ll get if serving pays better than comparable jobs.”Economists are not normal:Chris Ragan, chair of Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission, says he’s learned through his outreach efforts on carbon pricing that economists are not like normal people, and they think differently than most people about key metrics like prices.He says part of the negative response to carbon pricing is that many people only see a price increase, and not the system behind it.“Economists see prices as allocating resources, as sending signals, and over time changing behaviour in response to price changes,” he says.“Economists see not just a price, but a price system, as playing this super vital role in organizing society and allocating resources. Normal people don’t think that way.”last_img read more

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Nondrinkers pushing bars for better nonalcoholic cocktails

first_imgFor years, Carolyn Rebeyka has met friends at the same Regina bar every Friday afternoon for drinks. Sometimes they’d be celebrating a birthday or triumph at work, other times it was just to catch up.Then, about three years ago, her doctor put her on medication and suggested she avoid drinking to better monitor her body’s reaction to the drug.“It wasn’t permanent, but I actually kind of liked not drinking,” Rebeyka said, adding she was never a heavy drinker, but enjoyed not feeling the effects of alcohol.“Even if you had a few drinks, you could still feel the difference the next morning,” she added. “It’s not that you’re hungover, but you can tell the difference.”Now Rebeyka rarely drinks, but going to bars and restaurants is still a big part of her social life.Like many others who have decided to cut back on drinking, Rebeyka has found there are often few interesting drink options that don’t include booze. Many of the traditional options are uninspired (juice, sparkling water) or overly sweet (Shirley Temples, virgin daiquiris).“The options for alcohol, those are almost unlimited,” she said. “It seems like bars don’t want to be as creative when they’re serving their non-drinkers.”It’s not completely commonplace yet, but there is a growing push from some establishments to offer more interesting and complex non-alcoholic drink options.Kate Boushel, a bartender at Montreal’s Atwater Cocktail Club, said customers come in asking for non-alcoholic drinks “every night” and she enjoys making them since it allows for creativity on her part.“I’ve had fun and made cocktails that look exactly like other cocktails on my menu, just instead of alcohol, I’ve replaced it with low-sugar fruit juice,” she said.“I’ll do apple juice with a touch of carrot and maybe some thyme syrup, with a little bit of our house tonic,” she added. “That will be refreshing, light, but it will still be more complex than, let’s say, a virgin mojito.”People ordering non-alcoholic drinks often don’t want to draw attention to the fact that they aren’t drinking, and in some cases, they’ll actually request Boushel’s help in not blowing their cover.This often happens with pregnant women, when it’s too early to make an announcement.“With women who are pregnant, funny enough, the bartender is one of the first people who finds out,” Boushel said. “They don’t want their friends to know, so (they ask), ‘Can you make me look like I’m drinking?’”A similar request also frequently comes from people who are “out and about with business partners, or clients,” she said. “Maybe they’ve had enough, but they want to keep up appearances.”The team at Pretty Ugly cocktail bar in Toronto have gone even further to accommodate patrons who don’t drink. They spent nearly a year developing “placebo” liquors: non-alcoholic concoctions intended to replace actual booze. Owner and bartender Robin Goodfellow has developed an alcohol-free amaro, a Campari, and a plum wine.“I don’t feel that a bar is a place that only should serve people who want to get drunk,” Goodfellow said, adding he likes drinking but hates being drunk, and that many of his friends abstain from alcohol. “You can enjoy the music, the decor, the conversations, the energy of a bar even if you’re not drinking.”He doesn’t want his drinks to completely replicate the taste of liquor, but instead provide an option that “has that feeling of a Negroni or a Manhattan.” He said his alcohol-free Negroni is “definitely for a mature palate, someone who maybe used to drink Campari.”Goodfellow has wondered about serving a non-alcoholic cocktail to someone with a drinking problem who might be at risk of a relapse. He’s asked his friend who coined the term “placebo drink,” chef Matty Matheson, if he thought the offering could be dangerous.“If I make something really similar-tasting to something he used to drink, is that going to trigger his same old habits that he’s trying to avoid?” Goodfellow wondered. “He told us no, but … I would love to hear what people think about that, because that’s something I’m concerned about.”Dr. Jonathan Bertram, an addictions specialist at Toronto’s Centre for Addictions and Mental Health, said there’s no one single answer. Addiction experts have isolated two major triggers that can cause relapse in people with alcoholism, Bertram explained.“There’s the very obvious chemical trigger, which is a result of alcohol initiating a dopamine release in the brain,” he said. “But then there’s also this sort of anticipatory excitement or euphoria that comes from a person engaging in the ritual of drinking.”In those cases, drinking something meant to resemble an alcoholic drink — or even being in a bar environment at all — can be a trigger.But that risk is “not an easy thing to standardize or isolate,” because it doesn’t necessarily apply to everyone, Bertram added.And sometimes, the option of a placebo drink can “make it a lot easier for a person to go out and socially integrate into the drinking exercise without having to use alcohol.”He urged people in recovery to consult their doctors before making the decision.When Cory Bagdon of Thunder Bay, Ont., decided to take a break from alcohol for a summer while in university about ten years ago, he found the social pressure to drink was “isolating.”“When I gave up drinking, I would be treated differently,” he said. “I’d go out with the same people, but they wouldn’t talk to me the same way.”He recalled friends seeming “offended” that he didn’t want to drink, and said an acquaintance once got physically aggressive when he refused a shot.Even now Bagdon sometimes feels pressure to drink more than he wants to at social gatherings. To avoid an awkward conversation he’ll sometimes order a bottled beer and fill it up with water once it’s empty.“It seems strange that even though I don’t want to be a part of the drinking culture, I can’t separate myself from the social component of drinking culture,” he said.Goodfellow said his ultimate goal in dreaming up new drinks and running his bar in general is to make it more welcoming for people who aren’t interested in getting drunk.“I very much promote alcohol consumption, done responsibly,” he said.“But I love that maybe we’re changing the way non-drinkers enjoy nightlife.”last_img read more

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Energy stocks help push up Toronto index US markets mixed dollar slips

first_imgTORONTO – Energy stocks helped Canada’s main stock index close higher Thursday while U.S. markets were mixed and the loonie traded lower.The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index closed up 8.85 points at 16,192.78, including a 2.06 per cent climb in the S&P/TSX capped energy index.Oil and gas gains came as the July crude contract closed up US$1.22 or 1.88 per cent at US$65.95 as the price of the commodity continues to swing on supply speculation, especially out of Venezuela and Iran.The uptick in crude prices didn’t put the Canadian dollar in positive territory though, as the traditional correlation between the two has split, said Kash Pashootan, chief investment officer at First Avenue Investment Counsel Inc.“On days like today you’re seeing that correlation broken, you’re seeing oil prices higher and the Canadian dollar cheaper.”The Canadian dollar was down 0.35 of a US cent to average 77.09 cents US Wednesday as the US dollar strengthens on its stronger economy, said Pashootan.“You’re seeing the market start to identify the divergence between the overall health of the U.S. economy compared to the overall health of the Canadian economy.”The Bank of Canada said in a report Thursday that the housing market and high levels of consumer debt are still the top vulnerabilities for the financial system, but that both have shown signs of easing.Pashootan said he’s not convinced that the picture is improving and that the Canadian economy has yet to feel the full effects of recent interest rate hikes.“I disagree with Bank of Canada, I don’t think those key risks are easing. I think it’s premature to be cheering that those risks are subsiding. The fact of the matter is when you raise interest rates, it takes several quarters for the implications of higher rates to play themselves out for the average household.”He said Canada has yet to go through a credit reset cycle like the U.S., making the economy more vulnerable.“Not only have we not gone through a credit reset cycle, but we have continually grown household debt as a percentage of income,” said Pashootan.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average closed up 95.02 points at 25,241.41. The S&P 500 index ended down 1.98 points at 2,770.37 and the Nasdaq composite index was down 54.17 points at 7,635.07.The July copper contract closed up a penny at US$3.27 a pound after climbing five cents earlier in another day of gains for the metal as labour worries at the world’s largest copper mine in Chile raise supply concerns.The S&P/TSX base metal index had seen strong gains in recent days on the price climb, but it was down Thursday as investors took profits, said Pashootan.The July natural gas contract ended up three cents at US$2.93 per mmBTU and the August gold contract was up US$1.60 cents at US$1,303 an ounce.Cheese and dairy producer Saputo Inc. closed down $1.90 or 4.3 per cent at $42.25 after releasing quarterly results that were below analyst expectations.Questerre Energy Corp. saw it’s share price plunge 31 cents or 31.31 per cent to 68 cents after Quebec released draft oil and gas regulations that the company says will effectively ban fracking and any meaningful exploitation of natural gas in the province.last_img read more

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Americas Got Talent finale gives boost to NBC

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – “America’s Got Talent” ended its summer run last week with the most-watched entertainment programs on television since May, although its popularity dipped this summer.Just under 13 million people watched the final two episodes of the NBC competition last week, where magician Shin Lim was chosen as the winner. While those were bigger audiences than any entertainment show since the last original episode of “The Big Bang Theory,” Wednesday’s finale was down 18 per cent from the 2017 season finale, the Nielsen company said.Last season was an anomaly for the talent show, which had its highest ratings ever during its 12th season. Young ventriloquist Darci Lynne Farmer was a popular winner in 2017. Overall, viewership for the main Tuesday edition of the show was down 11 per cent from last year, Nielsen said.Still, “America’s Got Talent” remains by far the most popular television series of the summer, and NBC is planning a midseason edition this year for the first time.That series, along with a Sunday night football matchup, led NBC to a dominant week in the television ratings, nearly doubling its closest rival in audience size.NBC averaged 8.2 million viewers for the week. CBS was second with 4.2 million, Fox had 4 million, ABC had 2.7 million, Univision has 1.33 million, Telemundo had 1.32 million, ION Television had 1.2 million and the CW had 650,000.Fox News Channel was the week’s most popular cable network, averaging 2.71 million viewers in prime time. ESPN had 2.55 million, MSNBC had 1.88 million, HGTV had 1.31 million and USA had 1.3 million.ABC’s “World News Tonight” topped the evening newscasts with an average of 8.2 million viewers, and scored its biggest season advantage over NBC in 22 years. Last week the “NBC Nightly News” averaged 7.6 million and the “CBS Evening News” had 5.6 million.For the week of Sept. 17-23, the top 10 shows, their networks and viewerships: NFL Football: New England at Detroit, NBC, 19.46 million; “NFL Pre-Kick,” NBC, 13 million; “America’s Got Talent” (Tuesday), NBC, 12.99 million; “America’s Got Talent” (Wednesday), NBC, 12.88 million; NFL Football: Seattle at Chicago, ESPN, 11.89 million; “The OT,” Fox, 11.55 million; “Emmy Awards,” NBC, 10.22 million; “911,” Fox, 9.83 million; “Football Night in America,” NBC, 9.13 million; “60 Minutes,” CBS, 8.99 million.___ABC and ESPN are owned by The Walt Disney Co. CBS is owned by CBS Corp. CW is a joint venture of Warner Bros. Entertainment and CBS Corp. Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox. NBC and Telemundo are owned by Comcast Corp. ION Television is owned by ION Media Networks.___Online:http://www.nielsen.comlast_img read more

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Technology and retail companies lead US indexes higher

first_imgNEW YORK — Global stocks are rising Monday morning as big technology and retail stocks in the U.S. recover some of their recent losses on the first full trading day of the holiday shopping season. Indexes in Europe and Asia are also higher.London’s main stock index is rising after the British government and the European Union agreed to terms governing Britain’s departure from the EU in March, but it’s not clear if Parliament will approve the deal.Crude oil prices are rising after plunging by about one-third since early October.KEEPING SCORE: The S&P 500 index climbed 37 points, or 1.4 per cent, to 2,670 as of 10 a.m. Eastern time. On Friday the S&P 500 closed 10.2 per cent beneath the record high it had set in late September. That’s the second time this year the index has dropped 10 per cent from a recent peak, a mark known on Wall Street as a “correction.”The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 369 points, or 1.5 per cent, to 24,655. The Nasdaq composite rose 120 points, or 1.7 per cent, to 7,059. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks added 18 points, or 1.3 per cent, to 1,507. The Nasdaq and Russell have both entered corrections since setting record highs in late August.TRADE TALKS: U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping are scheduled to discuss their trade dispute in Buenos Aires at the end of this week. Stocks have skidded recently as investors have grown pessimistic that the two countries will be able to resolve their differences over technology policy and other issues, and they’re fearful that the rising tariffs imposed by the U.S. and China on each other’s goods will slow down global economic growth.Rising interest rates are also contributing to those fears. The Federal Reserve is expected to raise interest rates in mid-December, and investors will look for clues about the Fed’s plans for further increases in 2019.ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude added 2.9 per cent to $51.86 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, the international standard, gained 3.2 per cent to $60.69 a barrel in London.Crude prices have plunged by about one-third since early October as global supplies swelled. Worries that the global economy is slowing down have contributed to the drop. Another factor is the combination of rising oil production and the waivers the Trump administration granted to several countries that import a lot of oil from Iran. The administration re-imposed sanctions on Iran’s energy industry earlier this year and had insisted countries that buy oil from Iran would have to end their imports.Representatives of OPEC and other major oil producers will meet in Vienna in early December to discuss a possible cut in production.BREXIT DEAL: The European Union and Britain finally sealed an agreement governing the country’s departure from the bloc on March 29. British Prime Minister Theresa May must now get her divided Parliament to back the deal, which leaves Britain subject to rules of the bloc at least until the end of 2020, but avoids the worst-case scenario for businesses of a sudden return of tariffs and customs checks. It’s not clear if the deal will be approved, as May is facing opposition from both pro-Brexit and pro-EU camps.OVERSEAS: Germany’s DAX index rose 1.4 per cent. France’s CAC 40 rose 0.9 per cent, as did the British FTSE 100.Japan’s benchmark Nikkei 225, reopening after a holiday, added 0.8 per cent and South Korea’s Kospi jumped 1.2 per cent. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index rebounded 1.7 per cent.TECH AND RETAIL RALLY: Technology companies and retailers have been hit hard during the market’s recent slide, and they made some of the largest gains Monday morning. Apple rose 1.1 per cent to $174.31 and Microsoft added 2.4 per cent to $105.51. Cisco Systems gained 2.4 per cent to $45.58.Amazon rallied 3.2 per cent to $1,549 and Nike rose 1.8 per cent to $72.74.BONDS: Bond prices fell. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 3.08 per cent from 3.05 per cent. That sent interest rates higher, which helped banks. JPMorgan Chase jumped 2.1 per cent to $108.90 and Bank of America climbed 2 per cent to $27.52.Utility and real estate companies and makers of household goods didn’t rise as much as the rest of the market. Those stocks have made big gains during the market’s bout of turbulence in October and November because investors see them as safer options that offer steady returns with less risk. They also pay large dividends, which makes them less appealing when bond yields are rising.CURRENCIES: The dollar rose to 113.42 yen from 112.88 yen late Friday. The euro edged up to $1.1353 from $1.1330. The British pound rose to $1.2840 from $1.2810.____AP Markets Writer Marley Jay can be reached at http://twitter.com/MarleyJayAPMarley Jay, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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