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CARTOONIST JARLA HAS FRIENDS IN LOW PLACES ………….

first_imgCARTOONIST JARLA HAS FRIENDS IN LOW PLACES …………. was last modified: July 15th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:cartoondonegalGarth BrooksJarlalast_img read more

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Remembering what Gandhi gave South Africa, a century later

first_img“First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, and then you win,” Mahatma Gandhi. (Image: Sonia Gandhi) • Prema Naidoo Chief Whip Johannesburg City Council +27 11 407 7479 preman@joburg.org.za • Gandhi’s memory lingers in South Africa • A house of peace and simplicity • India and South Africa: 150 years of history • India-Africa trade on the up • India and South Africa growing together Prema Naidoo “You are descendants of Ishmael and therefore from your very birth bound to slave for the descendants of Esau. As the descendants of Esau we cannot admit you to rights placing you on equality with ourselves. You must rest content with what rights we grant you.” – President Paul Kruger, on the occasion of receiving a delegation of Indian traders upset with the Transvaal’s racial policy.One hundred years ago this year – in June 1914 – Mohandas Gandhi left South Africa for India. He had arrived an awkward shy young barrister and found in South Africa, and the Indian community’s fight for equality, the voice and path that changed the world. “You gave us Mohandas; we returned him to you as Mahatma.” – President Nelson Mandela in a speech in India.The “disease of colour prejudice” as Gandhi called it, was brought home to him during a train journey to Johannesburg in 1893. Travelling on a first class ticket in a compartment, the young barrister was manhandled off the train in Pietermaritzburg after a white traveller complained about his presence.This incident was the defining moment in his life. The moment he went from being a timid newly graduated barrister to becoming the thin older man of legend, in a homespun dhoti and shawl leading India towards independence from Britain.Standing on the platform, his anger rising, he went from annoyance to indignation to making a life-changing decision. Forgiveness, as he would later say, was not his to give. In that moment he was powerless but he could act to change his world, and the world. “The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.” Mahatma Gandhi (Image: Ramachandra Guha)  “You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is like an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.” ― Mahatma GandhiSatyagraha, the philosophy born out of that incident, means soul force and was not a weapon for the weak. It meant meeting force with non-violent resistance. Satya – truth – and agraha – firmness – won Gandhi thousands of supporters. Organised through the Natal Indian Congress his campaign of civil disobedience filled the prisons with thousands of supporters; in turn their sacrifice won him thousands more.He harnessed this wilful non-violent disobedience to protest laws restricting Indians from participating in the economy, invalidating their customary marriages and the restriction of free movement. The point of the campaign, for Gandhi, was not to break the law but to fill the prisons. Civil disobedience, arrest and imprisonment were meant to attract the attention of the authorities; to hold up a mirror to their unjust and uncivilised laws.For Gandhi, Satyagraha was a powerful because it required strength to not retaliate violently while being beaten. He suggested, and repeated often, that his campaign was that of a more powerful moral force battling against the weakness of unjust laws. He wrote later in life: “If we are satyagrahis and offer Satyagraha, believing us to be strong, two clear consequences result from it. Fostering the idea of strength, we grow stronger and stronger every day. With the increase in our strength, our Satyagraha too becomes more effective and we would never be casting about for an opportunity to give it up.”By 1914, when Gandhi left South Africa for India, he had managed to wrest concessions from President Louis Botha and his government. The four-year-old Union government repealed the £3 Tax; customary Indian marriages were recognised (women of Indian descent also protested vocally against these restrictions); some provisions of the Immigration Restriction Act were repealed; and the Black Act – the Transvaal Asiatic Law that required every Indian male to register and carry an ID certificate – was abolished. “Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.” ― Mahatma GandhiThe Natal Indian Congress (NIC) was the first organised resistance movement in South Africa, and it can be argued the NIC and its passive resistance campaign influenced the founders of the African National Congress that formed in Bloemfontein in 1912.The Bambatha Rebellion of 1906 reinforced the idea that any armed resistance would be met with the full might of the authorities. The leaders who gathered in Bloemfontein in 1912 to found the ANC understood this lesson and found a second path in Gandhi’s Satyagraha campaign.The strongest sign of Gandhi’s influence on South African resistance politics can be found in the 1952 Defiance Campaign. The intensity of the campaign against unjust pass laws and curfews for Africans was a sign of the growing frustration of South Africa’s majority. The 8 000 volunteers, members of the ANC, South African Indian Congress and the Coloured People’s Congress were, in the end, unsuccessful, but it showed the way forward to a unified South Africa. “You may never know what results come of your actions, but if you do nothing, there will be no results.” ― Mahatma Gandhi “The future depends on what you do today.” Mahatma Gandhi (Image: Nagarjun Kandukuru) Gandhi never returned to South Africa after he left in 2014. The legacy he bequeathed the country can be seen in the work of the many he influenced. The families and children of his closest confidants – Thambi Naidoo, Parsi Rustomji and Ahmed Cachalia – were all active in the struggle for a non-racial, democratic South Africa.South Africa played a pivotal role in shaping who Gandhi became; it moulded his political views and was the furnace that formed the philosophy that changed the world. His example of determined, non-violent struggle and the idea that defending the dignity of all makes for a better world remains relevant today.A hundred years ago a great man left our shores but we must remain committed to the lessons of life that he bequeathed to us all. “It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that’s important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there’ll be any fruit. But that doesn’t mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result.” ― Mahatma Gandhilast_img read more

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Wheat vernalization

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest For winter wheat to produce grain, it has to experience a period of cooler temperatures once the germination process has started. When exposed to temperatures near 40 degrees F for a period of about three weeks, wheat undergoes vernalization which allows it to produce a seed head. If for some reason wheat plants are not exposed to this period of temperatures they will stay in the vegetative stage and will not produce a seed head.The exact time and temperature required for vernalization varies from variety to variety. Research has linked winter hardiness and maturity to vernalization requirements. For instance, varieties that are more winterhardy and later maturating require lower temperatures and longer periods of cooler weather for vernalization to occur. Even in a mild Eastern Corn Belt Winter, wheat will still be exposed to temperatures cold enough to allow it to go through the process of vernalization.last_img read more

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‘Saharanpur riots timed for local polls’

first_imgA day after Saharanpur witnessed communal clashes after a “Shobha Yatra” led by BJP MP Raghav Lakhanpal without police permission, Dalits of Sadak Dudhli village and Saharanpur city alleged that the clashes were organised to communally polarise the area ahead of the Municipal Corporation elections due in May. The Dalits living in Saharanpur city and Sadak Dudhli village told The Hindu that they had “observed the birth anniversary of Ambedkar on April 14 in a ceremony in the village much before the BJP MP Raghav Lakhanpal planned a procession which was never supported by the majority of the dalits of the village”. The Hindu has a copy of their letter to the administration in which they had declared that they had organised the Ambedkar Jayanti programme in the village in the form of a “discussion of ideas” ((vichar goshthi). “We just wanted to inform you that we, the residents of Sadak Dudhli, organised Ambedkar Jayanti at Ambedkar Bhawan in the village on April 14,” said the letter signed by dalit residents of the village and sent to the District Magistarte, the Senior Superintendent of Police and other administrative officials. The Senior Superintendent of Police Love Kumar told The Hindu that situation in Saharanpur was “peaceful and under control”. He said that the majority of the local dalits in Sadak Dudhli were never in favour of taking out any kind of procession on the name of Ambedkar illegally. Balbir Singh Gautam, a member of Ambedkar Samaj party told The Hindu the administration did not give permission for any new shobha yatra even during the rule of Bahujan Samaj Party. “I am sure the situation would have been different had they held a discussion with the administration and the Muslim community which had no objection to Shobha Yatra if it is done with permission. The problem was the politics done by the local MP BJP Raghav Lakhanpal who wanted to misuse Ambedkar’s name to organise a riot only to communally polarise the region ahead of the Municipal Corporation elections due next month,” Gautam told The Hindu over phone from Saharanpur.“BJP wants to communally polarise the region ahead of the civic body elections because BJP candidates lost the Assembly polls from Saharanpur city and Saharanpur rural, the two seats which constitutes Saharanpur Municipal corporation electorate,”he added. Inderpal, a dalit activist who had in the past worked among the dalits in Sadak Dudhli village asked, “If Mr. Lakhanpal was such a big follower of Ambedkar why does not he first start organising Ambedkar Shbha yatra in urban areas where people belonging to upper caste had prevented the dalits from organising Shibha yatra.”. Gautam said that the procession which was led by the BJP MP was largely “constituted by people who were outsiders and who did not belong to the village”. Mr. Lakhanpal, on his part said the BJP would organise the “Shobha Yatra” in the village. He rejected the allegation that he insisting on it due to the upcoming Municipal Corporation elections. UP Police on Friday booked the BJP MP along with his brother Rahul Lakhanpal Sharma, BJP MLA from Deoband Brajesh SIngh and several others on charges of instigating the mob to engage in violence and destruction of public property and attack on the police office and officials. (EOM)last_img read more

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NIT Goa to tie up with Madras, Bombay IITs

first_imgPANAJI: The National Institute of Technology (NIT), Goa, is working on a proposal to sign a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras (IIT-M), to transfer 10 of its students to IIT-M for orientation every year before they proceed for the PhD programme.The institute is also working on a project to introduce virtual classrooms and blended massive open online courses through mutually interactive sessions with the participation of reputed faculties from IIT Bombay. NIT Goa director Gopal Mugeraya told reporters on Friday that the institute will introduce mechanical and civil engineering courses from 2018-19. Mr. Mugeraya said the construction for the new campus in Cuncolim, South Goa, being built for an estimated ₹1,200 crore, is expected to begin by November. An administrative block and three centres with multiple classrooms will be constructed during the first phase, which is expected to be ready by 2020 with an investment of ₹500 crore.last_img read more

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