Category: csexmt

NetEnt targets UK retail market with Blueprint deal

first_img Stockholm-listed casino games developer NetEnt has agreed a deal to roll out its content with Gauselmann Group-owned Blueprint Gaming as part of an effort to enhance its presence in the UK market.Under the agreement, Blueprint will launch the NetEnt portfolio of slots across its network of retail gaming machines in arcades, bingo halls, licensed betting offices and pubs in the UK.Full terms of the deal were not disclosed, but it was confirmed that it will be a long-term agreement, with the first games to go live during the first half of 2020.“This is a landmark deal for the NetEnt Group in our quest to build brand awareness and new revenue streams from new product verticals,” NetEnt’s chief strategy officer Andy Whitworth said. “Blueprint are the market leader in the UK, and we are delighted to expand our reach with them.”Blueprint managing director Matt Cole added: “The ability to offer our customers and players content from NetEnt is an exciting opportunity and we are delighted to be working closely together on offering UK players a truly compelling variety of market leading content.”In November of last year, Blueprint acquired games developer Livewire Gaming for an undisclosed sum as part of an effort to increase its own presence in the UK market.At the time, Blueprint said the purchase of UK-based Livewire would help to strengthen its slots offering. Livewire specialises in Category C, B3, D and B4 games, and has developed a number of titles in partnership with Blueprint.Last month, NetEnt also announced the launch of a new aggregation platform in NetEnt Connect, featuring content from recently acquired slots specialist Red Tiger Gaming.Starting out initially in a closed beta form with Casino Room (Ellmount Gaming), NetEnt said NetEnt Connect would tap into integrated partner game suppliers and also NetEnt’s own bonus and gamification engine, NetEnt Engage. Casino & games NetEnt targets UK retail market with Blueprint deal 28th January 2020 | By contenteditor Topics: Casino & games Strategy Tech & innovation Slots AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Regions: UK & Ireland Email Address Stockholm-listed casino games developer NetEnt has agreed a deal to roll out its content with Gauselmann Group-owned Blueprint Gaming as part of an effort to enhance its presence in the UK market. Tags: Slot Machines Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

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Oando Plc (OANDO.ng) HY2012 Presentation

first_imgOando Plc (OANDO.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Energy sector has released it’s 2012 presentation results for the half year.For more information about Oando Plc (OANDO.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Oando Plc (OANDO.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Oando Plc (OANDO.ng)  2012 presentation results for the half year.Company ProfileOando Plc is the largest integrated energy solutions provider in Nigeria and internationally. The company has onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration operations throughout Africa and trades in crude refined and unrefined petroleum products. Separate operations are responsible for storing, hauling and distributing petroleum and gas products; providing logistics and other services; and managing aviation activities. Oando Trading supplies and trades crude oil and petroleum products which includes naphtha, gasoline, fuel oil, gas oil, kerosene and bitumen. Oando Financial Trading & Hedging offers a highly centralised and financial risk management framework and is active in most financial energy markets worldwide. Oando Shipping & Chartering has access to a global pool of shipping brokers and vessel owners which means it is able to offer highly competitive rates for shipping and chartering services. Established in 1956 and formerly known as Unipetrol Nigeria Plc, the company changed its name to Oando Plc in 2003. Oando Plc is a subsidiary of Ocean and Oil Development Partners Limited. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Oando Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Courteville Business Solutions Plc (COURTV.ng) 2012 Annual Report

first_imgCourteville Business Solutions Plc (COURTV.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Support Services sector has released it’s 2012 annual report.For more information about Courteville Business Solutions Plc (COURTV.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Courteville Business Solutions Plc (COURTV.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Courteville Business Solutions Plc (COURTV.ng)  2012 annual report.Company ProfileCourteville Business Solutions Plc is the largest e-business solutions company in West Africa and offers financial management and advisory services, business solutions, e-commerce and online marketing solutions. The company is the patent owner of the AutoReg TM Business Solutions Platform. Courteville Business Solutions Plc is represented in 24 states in Nigeria and has business interests in Guinea, Zimbabwe and Jamaica. Other e-business services include NAPAMS, a regulated product administration and monitoring solution for NAFDAC; NIID, an insurance policies database solution for the Nigerian Insurers Association (NIA) and the Insurance Council of Zimbabwe (ICZ); and the AutoReg Inspector TM remote verification tool for law enforcement agencies. Courteville Business Solutions Plc’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Courteville Business Solutions Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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How I’d invest £1k in a Stocks and Shares ISA today

first_img There’s a ‘double agent’ hiding in the FTSE… we recommend you buy it! Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. See all posts by Rupert Hargreaves How I’d invest £1k in a Stocks and Shares ISA today Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Click here to get access to our presentation, and learn how to get the name of this ‘double agent’! Enter Your Email Address But these arn’t the only companies that I think look attractive right now. Another blue-chip champion that one might benefit from buying right now is outlined in the free report below. Rupert Hargreaves owns no share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended GlaxoSmithKline. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Rupert Hargreaves | Saturday, 31st October, 2020 Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Image source: Getty Images I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Don’t miss our special stock presentation.It contains details of a UK-listed company our Motley Fool UK analysts are extremely enthusiastic about.They think it’s offering an incredible opportunity to grow your wealth over the long term – at its current price – regardless of what happens in the wider market.That’s why they’re referring to it as the FTSE’s ‘double agent’.Because they believe it’s working both with the market… And against it.To find out why we think you should add it to your portfolio today… Stock and Shares ISAs are a great tool to save for the future. Most online stockbrokers now offer one of these products. They’re managed just like a regular dealing account. Investors can own any investment they like in an ISA as long as it’s traded on a “recognised exchange.” Put simply, this means most developed market blue-chip stocks are eligible. The main benefit of opening a Stocks and Shares ISA is its tax benefits. Any income or capital gains earned on money held within one of these wrappers is tax-free. Investors don’t even need to declare the money in their tax returns. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…That’s why these products are fantastic savings tools, and any investor can benefit from opening one today. Stocks and Shares ISA investments Now may not seem like the best time to buy shares. The outlook for the global economy is highly uncertain, and share prices could fall further in the short term. However, often, the best time to buy stocks is when other investors are selling. That’s why I believe one could benefit from buying stocks today and holding for the long term. Due to the uncertainty surrounding the economy, I’d stock up with blue-chip stocks. Some businesses stand out to me as being some of the top investments to own right now. GlaxoSmithKline is a great example. Last week, the company announced that, due to a better-than-expected trading performance in the third quarter, group profits would only fall by -1% this year. This is incredibly encouraging, considering the current operating environment. This projection showcases the company’s defensive nature. But it’s not only Glaxo that’s forecasting market-leading growth this year. Reckitt Benkiser is forecast to report a modest increase in net profit for the year from 2018 (it recorded an enormous loss for 2019). The Durex and Dettol owner has benefited from an explosion in demand for cleaning products this year. If I had a lump sum of £1k in my Stocks and Shares ISA to invest right now, I’d seriously consider buying one of these two stocks. Other options I also think it could be worth considering an FTSE All-Share tracker fund. According to some projections, UK stocks are trading at a discount of 40% to international equities. This is the cheapest they’ve been for decades, which could be a fantastic opportunity. Therefore, I think one could profit from buying a diversified UK stock index like the FTSE All-Share. On another front, blue-chip tech stock Avast may also be worth considering. There are only a handful of high-growth tech stocks listed in London, and this is one of them. If investors wants exposure to this fast-expanding sector, Avast might be a good buy. I’d own this alongside the other blue-chips above. Doing so would provide a good combination of income and growth for a Stocks and Shares ISA portfolio.last_img read more

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1 tech stock I’d buy and hold forever

first_img I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Zaven Boyrazian | Thursday, 5th November, 2020 | More on: TRCS Zaven Boyrazian does not own shares in Tracsis. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Tracsis. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The transportation industry has a lot of moving cogs to ensure everything runs smoothly. However, the rapid expansion of both railway, and general traffic over the last 50 years has created enormous inefficiencies that this tech stock is helping to eliminate.The tech stock opportunityTracsis (LSE:TRCS) is a software solutions business for the transportation industry. It uses innovative technologies to increase the performance of UK transport operators while simultaneously reducing expenses.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Since its IPO in 2007, the company has built up its reputation within the sector. Today it serves some of the largest transport operators and authorities – including Network Rail, and the Department for Transport among other government agencies.The business can be broken down into two segments that roughly generate a balanced proportion of revenue.The Rail Technology & Services segment allows its clients to use its proprietary Remote Condition Monitoring (RCM) system. RCM continually monitors the electrical pulses travelling down railway lines to detect any irregularities in real-time. If a problem is detected, the railway operator can send in a team of engineers to further investigate the issue and perform any necessary maintenance before it evolves into a severe problem.The second segment is Traffic & Data Services, which is responsible for a slightly higher proportion of the revenue stream. The firm engages with clients in the collection and analysis of traffic data. Using geographical information systems (GIS), clients can painlessly perform traffic and parking management for popular events. These data services are further extended to local authorities for better transportation route planning within rail, traffic, and pedestrian-rich environments.The financials and risks aheadThe tech stock has flourished over the past five years, with annual revenue almost doubling to £43m in 2019. However, the 2020 interim report suggests that revenue growth is accelerating. The first two quarters of 2020 reaped £26.4m alone – 41% higher than the previous year.This growth primarily originates from the Traffic & Data Services segment of the business. Tracsis secured a new multi-year contract in Ireland, as well as profiting from the vast array of planned events in the second half of 2020.However, this growth may be short-lived, at least temporarily. The Covid-19 pandemic has led to many events being cancelled or postponed for the foreseeable future, and with it goes the increased revenue.Fortunately, the Rail Technology & services segment has been able to transition to a remote working approach and thus can continue to carry the business forward throughout the pandemic.The bottom lineSo far, the majority of growth achieved by the firm stems from acquisitions, rather than organic growth. But this may soon change.Tracsis has begun expanding into North America, which presents an enormous opportunity for the Rail Technology & Services segment.Here in the UK, the National Rail network consists of approximately 10,000 miles of rail tracks. North America has over 140,000 miles. The US expansion is a slow process with ongoing paid trials among transit operators.Tracsis is on my watchlist and if it’s successful, then I think my portfolio could see explosive returns from this tech stock. 1 tech stock I’d buy and hold forever Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge!center_img Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Enter Your Email Address Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Image source: Getty Images. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. See all posts by Zaven Boyrazianlast_img read more

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‘Winter Count’ brings indigenous storytelling method to the Gospel

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ ‘Winter Count’ brings indigenous storytelling method to the Gospel Niobrara Convocation combines Episcopal, Sioux traditions Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Indigenous Ministries Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET June 28, 2012 at 12:50 pm This is the kind of celebration of respect for who we are today, looking forward, by which the lament at general council should be followed. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Servicecenter_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Comments (1) Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 25, 2012 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rhonda Muir says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Rev. Terry Star, with an eagle feather tied in his hair, reads the gospel during the June 17 Eucharist that closed the 140 Niobrara Convocation at Fort Yates, North Dakota. Another deacon, the Rev. Brandon Mauai, holds the microphone for Star. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service — Fort Yates, N.D.] The story is told that nearly 100 years ago an Episcopal bishop came to a gathering of Sioux Episcopalians to tell them they had to put away all things Indian in order to be good Christians.To make his point, North Dakota Bishop John Poyntz Tyler had a barrel set in the middle of the gathering and told the Indians to put their Indian possessions in the barrel. When the men asked if the archdeacon had to give up the beaded moccasins he was wearing, Tyler replied, “Yes, those too.”The barrel was sealed and taken out of the community, its contents never seen again.Bill Little Bird, who was born in the early 1900s, was at that gathering and told the story to the Rev. Canon John Floberg, canon missioner for Episcopal community on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Floberg and others used the events of that story to offer an extraordinary reversal of the requirements of Tyler and others to the recent Niobrara Convocation.The convocation is a nearly annual gathering of mainly Sioux Indians. This 140th meeting was held June 14-17 at the Standing Rock Community Middle School outside of Fort Yates on the portion of the reservation that is in North Dakota – the first time it has met in that state.From the conference’s beginning the evening of June 14 until about noon on June 15, another barrel sat near the altar in the school cafeteria — a barrel that Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori later described as a “barrel of shame and confinement.”The Rev. Canon John Floberg, left, and the Rev. Terry Star set the Winter Count upright for the members of the 140 Niobrara Convocation to see during a June 15 service at Fort Yates, North Dakota, June 15. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergAs noonday prayers began on the 15th, some clergy on the reservation’s North Dakota side and North Dakota Bishop Michael Smith processed to the altar; Smith vested in rochet, chimere and Indian feather headdress. As they assembled, Cedric Goodhouse Jr. began to beat his drum and sing a “calling song” in Lakota: “I am coming from above, grandfather told me to come.”The congregation then turned in the four directions as they sang the hymn “Chant to the Four Winds,” written by North Dakota Assisting Bishop Carol Gallagher, and prayed as a litany of massacres, relocations, a smallpox epidemic and broken treaties was recited. Next, the clergy surrounded the barrel and, with sage burning, opened it to remove a rolled-up buffalo robe. The robe was stretched carefully on a large frame and set upright in front of the convocation.The inner side of the buffalo skin was painted with a counter-clockwise spiral of 72 black ink pictographs of the life of Jesus as told in the Gospel of Luke, thus making what the Sioux call a “Winter Count.”Typically, a Winter Count contains one pictograph representing a memorable event in each year of a community’s life. Winter Counts were used in conjunction with oral history to tell the community’s story to its members and others.Because the Bible does not contain a year-by-year account of Jesus’ life, this Winter Count’s 72 drawings were based on Jesus’ commissioning of 72 evangelists in pairs (Luke 10:1). The count begins at the center of the robe with a symbol that its creator Dakota Goodhouse, cousin of the drummer, said represented the time when in a “long time ago winter something holy came this way.”The pictographs spiral from that event counter-clockwise, the direction a human’s hair grows from the spot on the crown of the head where Sioux believe the Spirit entered their bodies and left its mark of life spiraling outward, Goodhouse said during the service.The Winter Count begins at the center of the robe with a symbol that its creator Dakota Goodhouse said represented the time when in a “long time ago winter something holy came this way.” ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergThis Winter Count, destined to have a place near the baptismal font at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Fort Yates, is “a symbol for the community to decide what it takes out” to use to tell about  the Christian faith, said Floberg, who has worked on the Standing Rock reservation for 20 years.  He said that the robe was given in “respect and humility,” adding that he was speaking only of the North Dakota Sioux’s experience of being forced to put away their Indian things.“I declare this buffalo robe, as a sacred expression of this culture, be restored as it was used in former generations to give honor, that it may honor Jesus and make his story known in and through his people,” Smith said during the service, which was a variation of the Book of Occasional Services’ liturgies for restoring things that had been made profane (page 317) and dedicating items for use in church (page 196).Smith, with the congregation’s help, set apart the Winter Count and prayed to God that “through prayer and worship we may know you as you speak to us today.”Floberg noted that Episcopalians use the service for restoring things that had become profane after, for example, a break-in had been committed in a church. “This is us saying we broke into their culture and we profaned their things that were sacred,” he told Episcopal News Service.Winter Count’s presence is unusualThe appearance of a Winter Count to the tune of an Indian drumming and singing and, later during the convocation, the sight of Indian clergy wearing moccasins and eagle feathers and smudging the altar using sage and an eagle feather fan during the closing Eucharist, were highly unusual at Niobrara.Also unusual, Floberg said, was Cedric Goodhouse’s decision to sing a pipe song in the noonday service. He sang in Lakota, “Look at the pipe, it is sacred. Look at the altar, it is sacred,” as the Winter Count was being unrolled and tied to its frame.The Sioux traditionally consider the pipe a mediator between humans and the gods, Floberg said. Because Christians understand Christ to be a mediator between themselves and God, early evangelists treated the pipe as one of the Indians’ sacred items that had to be eliminated from their lives.Attitudes towards restoring such things as the Winter Count to Native-American communities and their churches are complicated by the fact that, for most Sioux living today, “restoring” is not exactly what is happening. Most have never lived with those artifacts in their churches, according to Floberg and the Rev. Craig Wirth, vice itancan, or president, of the Niobrara Council. For instance, only recently have the beautiful and seemingly benign-appearing Sioux star quilts been allowed in Episcopal churches in the Dakotas, they each noted. (More information about such quilts is here).Jefferts Schori, who attended this year’s convocation and preached at the June 18 Eucharist, praised the Winter Count project in her sermon. She called the painted buffalo robe “something to be blessed and proudly shared,” saying it was a “remarkable example” of efforts at “reworking what God planted here a very long time ago, partnering with the Creator, and continuing to expect more abundant fruit.”“I can’t imagine a more powerful way to tell the Jesus story to those who don’t know it than in this gift offered by one who has listened well and met the creative power of the Great Spirit,” she said, referring to Dakota Goodhouse, who created the pictograph robe.Jefferts Schori based her sermon on the day’s Gospel reading, which included the parable of the mustard seed. She told the congregation that everyone was meant to plant a seed and expect “a surprising and abundant harvest.”“We don’t know what the mature plant will look like, but we can hope that this tiny seed will produce a tree of life for all the birds – Eagles, Red Birds, Two Hawks, Noisy Hawks and Driving Hawks, and maybe even some Fox, Elk, Bear and Horse people,” she said, invoking the family names of many of the Sioux present.Anderson receives Lakota nameBoth the presiding bishop and House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson attended the four-day convocation. On June 15, a group of Cheyenne River Sioux and others gave Anderson a new name.Linda Thompson, who lives on the Lower Brule Sioux Indian Reservation, made these beaded elk-hide moccasins for House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson to wear June 15 for the ceremony during which she received the Lakota name Cante Tinza Win or Strong Heart Woman. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergWhile the rest of the convocation participated in “sunset prayers” in the cafeteria, a group of about 25, including Diocese of South Dakota Bishop John Tarrant and Sioux Elder Wilbur Conquering Bear, gathered in a corner of the middle school gymnasium for the naming ceremony led by Don Metcalf, council sergeant-at-arms.Anderson put on beaded elk-hide moccasins and stood on a patchwork quilt with her kola, or friend, the Very Rev. Ward Simpson, dean of Calvary Cathedral in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The gathering turned in the four directions as it sang the doxology in Lakota. Then Metcalf announced that Anderson would now be called Cante Tinza Win, or Strong Heart Woman.Metcalf told ENS that he chose the name because Anderson’s position as president of the House of Deputies called for a strong heart. “And she has a strong heart for Native American people,” he added.The ceremony, however, was incomplete due to Sioux tradition. Metcalf explained that he could not tie an eagle feather in Anderson’s hair or give her a star quilt because his uncle’s daughter had died within the year. His elder, Ed Widow, on the Cheyenne River Reservation told him that to do so within a year of the woman’s death could mean that Anderson “might get a spirit of death,” he said.Anderson will come to the 141st Niobrara Convocation on the Lower Brule reservation in South Dakota next June to complete the ceremony.Jefferts Schori received the Lakota name Ni-ce Olewin, Looks for the Needy, during Niobrara in 2008.Niobrara has long historyThe Niobrara Convocation, first held in 1870, is the regular gathering of Native-American Episcopalians of what was the Niobrara Missionary District. It is said that although traditionally it included no Indian ceremonials, Niobrara has served the same social function as the sacred Sun Dance, when friends and relatives came together in the summer, and was not unlike the traditional affairs held in the camp circle each summer by the various tribes.Emma Goodhouse, of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, beaded an Anglican Compass Rose medallion for Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori. The 16 dentalia at the bottom are scaphopod mollusk shells. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergSome Sioux have revived the Sun Dance, and some Niobrara participants brought Jefferts Schori to visit a nearby Sun Dance on July 15. In her sermon, she called its revival part of “a search for healing from the pain of old destruction.”Episcopal Church involvement with the Sioux began in the mid- to late-1800s after the 1862 Dakota uprising in neighboring Minnesota that resulted in the U.S. government deporting them to reservations in South Dakota. Just after the Civil War, the federal government offered land to various Christian denominations in exchange for their complicity in its effort to force Indians to assimilate into the white settlers’ culture through the federal government’s reservations system.The Episcopal Church helped to carry out that plan mainly east of the Missouri River. The 1871 General Convention created the Niobrara Missionary District, which included parts or all of what are now North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming and Nebraska.Today, life on the reservations in North and South Dakota, and large off-reservation portions of both states, can be partially described in a series of grim statistics. The three counties with the nation’s highest poverty rate, and four of the top 10, are in western South Dakota, according to U.S. Census Bureau statistics reported here. Ziebach County in the Cheyenne Reservation is first at 50.1 percent. Todd County in the Rosebud Reservation and Shannon County in the Pine Ridge Reservation are ranked second and third.Eighty percent of the people living on the Pine Ridge reservation are unemployed, according to statistics here. Life expectancy is among the lowest in the Western Hemisphere: 48 years for men and 52 for women. The infant mortality rate is five times higher than the United States national average. The rate of amputations among diabetics there is two to four times higher than the national average.The context of the Episcopal Church’s current mission and ministry in the Dakotas was made clear during the convocation’s “ingathering” on June 16.Very small mission churches are spread over vast expanses of land. For instance, the Cheyenne River Mission in South Dakota has 11 churches serving an area the size of Connecticut. Two have indoor plumbing. All 11 are served by one priest, the Rev. Margaret Watson, along with a deacon and licensed lay ministers.The Niobrara Circle is a traditional ending to the convocation in which all of the participants greet each other. The 140th circle was more of a line that looped through a parking lot of the Standing Rock Community Middle School in Fort Yates, North Dakota. As part of the greeting, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori shakes hands with the Rev. Hazel Red Bird, a deacon who serves on the Cheyenne River Mission in South Dakota. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergThe ingathering is when congregation members and clergy report on their activities and challenges since the last convocation. They spoke about concerns over paying off a propane bill from last winter and thanksgivings for new church windows that latch and eliminate the wind chill associated with standing at the altar. They reported on vandalism of their buildings; congregations revitalized and others closed; young people learning Lakota by learning to sing from the Dakota hymnal; skunks taking up residence under a church and forcing out the congregation; 66 baptisms and 41 burials conducted on one mission in the last year, of the frequency of funerals (one priest buried three babies in a row and then a 14-year-old girl in the past few days); and yet another suicide.It is uncommon for Niobrara’s mission churches to have electricity, water and indoor toilets. Many reports included information about the introduction of those three so-called “luxuries” or the continuing lack of them. For instance, representatives of the Cheyenne River Mission announced a brand new “double-seater,” and those on the Pine Ridge Mission declared it “amazing” that two of their church buildings now have indoor plumbing.With their reports came financial contributions. Most congregations in the council are aided by the two dioceses, which are, in turn, two of the four Indian Country dioceses aided by the Episcopal Church’s triennial budget (Alaska and the Navajoland Area Mission are the other two). Yet congregation members gather money via fundraising and individual contributions to help support the activities of the men, women and youth of the Niobrara Council.Total pledges were typically in the $100-$200 range, but some were much smaller. For instance, a newly reopened church on the Lower Brule reservation in South Dakota that was described as “sit[ing] in the middle of nowhere on a hill overlooking the Missouri River” with an average Sunday attendance of 15 pledged $20.During a break from the in-gathering, some congregations offered handmade star quilts for auction to raise money for causes ranging from that propane bill from last winter to an effort to defray the costs of a kidney transplant needed by one of the council’s members.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service.last_img read more

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Episcopal bishops’ statements on guilty verdicts in killing of George…

first_imgEpiscopal bishops’ statements on guilty verdicts in killing of George Floyd New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Apr 21, 2021 Missouri Bishop Deon JohnsonA jury convicted Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on all charges in the death of George Floyd. Bishop Deon Johnson and Deacon Chester Hines issued these statements after the verdict was read.There have been many reactions to the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial; relief, anger, hurt, disappointment, grief. No matter the reactions, no matter the feelings, the lives of two families have been shattered irreparably. There are no winners, because two lives, two families, both precious in God’s sight, have been forever lost and broken.As people of faith, we look toward justice and not toward vengeance and we know that justice is always companioned with mercy. May God’s infinite mercy surround our nation as we continue to be fractured by division and disunity. We are reminded that we must continue to engage in the ongoing justice-centered work of racial reckoning in our ongoing walk with Jesus.I invite you therefore to pray for the Floyd and Chauvin families. Pray for peace in our communities, that we may look towards justice and not vengeance. Pray and act for an end to the scourge of racism in our country. Pray that we my live into the ideal of equality and equity for all God’s beloved people. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL George Floyd, center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service] Former police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty of murder and manslaughter on April 20 in the May 2020 killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry released this video message before the verdicts. Other Episcopal leaders from across the church issued statements in the hours before and after the reading of the verdicts. The following is a selection of those statements.Minnesota Bishop Craig LoyaToday’s verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd will undoubtedly bring a sense of justice, and even relief, to many, many people in Minnesota and around the nation. Our history is full of examples of the legal system’s failure to hold public servants accountable for violence against Black, brown, and Indigenous bodies, so today is an important step in the direction of a more just society.At the same time, Mr. Floyd’s murder is a symptom of a deep sickness that infects every one of us, and every institution that makes up the fabric of our common life. One verdict, however momentous, will not heal this sickness that lies deep inside us. If we are to be faithful to the call of the gospel, joining the Spirit’s work of healing and liberation must now form a core part of how we spend the rest of our lives. As we move forward together, there are several things to bear in mind about what it means for us as disciples of Jesus to join this work.First, this work does not happen quickly. Over the last several centuries, racism has so thoroughly informed how we live together in the world that it is programmed into every public and private institution, every education, criminal justice, banking, and housing policy, and indeed, even the very cells that make up our bodies. Every aspect of our life as a nation is engineered to advantage some and disadvantage others based on the race they appear to belong to. It took several centuries for us to reach this moment, dismantling and rebuilding a new future will be work that consumes the rest of all of our lives.Second, this work must be empowered by the Holy Spirit, and rooted in the transformation of our own hearts. Racism is part of the web of interlocking sin we are all trapped in. In my forty-four years of living, all the pain I have both inflicted and endured has convinced me beyond any doubt that by ourselves, we are incapable of escaping that sin, and that we can only be liberated by the power of God’s almighty love. It will not do for us to say we need action instead of prayer. Regular, intentional, disciplined practices of anchoring my body, mind, and soul to the living God is the only way I have a chance of acting in a way that is faithful. If I act in the world before my own heart has been taken over by the power of God then I have misplaced my faith in my own abilities, and it’s people like me that have made such a mess of things to begin with. This is not about our own good intentions, or noble efforts, or performative wokeness. The healing our world so desperately cries out for can only be done by God, and we can only be on board with what God is doing if we are offering our hearts up for healing moment by moment.Here in the Episcopal Church in Minnesota, this work will need to start with telling the truth about how our own church has been complicit in building systems, both in and outside of the church, that privilege some at the expense of others based on race. This will ask us to take a fearless moral inventory of how we have functioned, and then begin to discern what we might look like on the other side. Even as I write this, this work is beginning, and as this year unfolds, there will be invitations to our whole diocese to engage with it.We will also need to join what the Spirit is doing outside the institution of the church. Our society is being invited to reimagine how we understand and approach policing and public safety, how might we imagine new approaches to our lending, housing, employment, and educational policies, and on and on. If we are to be faithful, we as Spirit-soaked disciples of Jesus will need to be fully present to all of that work.To confess that God is Trinity is to confess that God’s very heart is unity without uniformity, and difference without division, that God’s very heart is a relationship of perfect mutual love, and that Christian life is always about making room inside ourselves for the reality of another, and to be transformed by that encounter into something that is holy, and altogether closer to the heart of God. That is what God in Jesus has done for us, and that’s what we are called to do with, in, and for one another and the world.The question for us after the trial is: who shall we become? Can we learn to see ourselves, not as people competing for rungs on a ladder, but as members of the crowd pressing in on Jesus, diverse and different and broken, but united by our faith that Jesus alone has the power to heal the sickness inside us, in the assurance that his power, like that of God our mother, is an inexhaustible well of love, of healing, of joy? Can we give up ourselves, and our whole lives, as an offering to that love, until it is gloriously done, on earth as it is in heaven?Atlanta Bishop Rob WrightThis evening we have learned that former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been found guilty of every charge in the death of George Floyd.If this is a victory, it is a victory for the role of law in affirming human dignity. If it is a victory, it is a victory for the countless law enforcement officers who embrace accountability and who practice appropriate use of force as they protect and serve without prejudice.Still, justice requires more than sending one man to prison. Justice requires us to acknowledge and change the fact that Black, Brown, and poor Americans are often treated differently than other Americans, particularly in encounters with law enforcement and the criminal justice system.So, today’s verdict does not signal the end of our work for equity and justice but rather confirms that to fight for equity and justice is the right fight to be in.Indianapolis Bishop Jennifer Baskerville-BurrowsLast Sunday, during my visitation at St. Paul’s, Indianapolis, one of the saints in that congregation asked me how I was doing during these long days in which the deaths of Black and brown people at the hands of police are a daily news story. Now that Derek Chauvin has been found guilty on all counts for the murder of George Floyd, I want to tell you how I answered that question.One day shortly before the trial began, I realized that in the busyness of the last few months, I had let my license plates expire. It put the fear of God into me. As soon as I realized what I had done, I immediately rearranged my day to get to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles. On the way, I had to explain to my ten-year-old son why I was shaking as I was driving, and why we had to go right then, urgently, with no delays.And then, a few days later, fueled by the dread that every Black mother carries in her heart, I talked with my son again. I told him that in just a few years when he learns to drive, he must never, ever, for any reason, let his tags expire, and I told him why. My soul is still in anguish at the need to warn my son against what awaits him in the world.This trial has been a very personal issue for me, and for many other Black people. I wish it weren’t. I am relieved that Derek Chauvin has been held accountable for the murder of George Floyd. But accountability is not the same thing as justice, and it will not bring George Floyd back to those who loved him.Tonight, fresh with relief at the verdict, I am aware of my deep longing for true justice, the kind that becomes possible when people like us promise to stand with the vulnerable and marginalized to transform systems of injustice. When we do that, we are committing ourselves to creating a world in which young men can learn to drive without their mothers fearing for their lives. When you dedicate yourselves to this work, you mean that you want your bishop to be able to drive to the BMV without panic, even on expired tags. When we stand together as beacons of Christ, we are saying that we want communities in which the public safety system protects the lives of all of God’s people and in which we no longer need to learn the names of those who have been taken from us by police.In the days to come, many of you will want to show up and stand in solidarity with our allies. I pray that you do so peacefully, with hearts bent on justice and mercy, and with your eye on the Beloved Community we long to be.Thank you for your witness, this Eastertide and always.Washington Bishop Mariann BuddeEditor’s note: Joint statement with Washington National Cathedral Dean Randy Hollerith; the Rev. Leonard Hamlin Sr., the cathedral’s canon missioner and minister of equity and inclusion; and the Rev. Robert Fisher, rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square.While the trauma of George Floyd’s murder remains, today we give thanks that justice has been done.The facts were never in doubt: former police officer Derek Chauvin held his knee on George Floyd’s neck for over 9 minutes until he died. We saw it with our own eyes.What we did not know until today was whether our criminal justice system would render justice in a case of a White officer taking the life of a Black man.We pray for God’s mercy to surround George Floyd’s family and friends as they hold their private grief in the spotlight of an international movement demanding acknowledgement that Black lives matter as much as other lives. To them, and to all for whom there is so rarely justice, we pledge our continued commitment to the work of confronting racism in ourselves, our churches and the nation, including the racism present within policing in this country.We also pray for all police officers, for their discernment when on duty and for their safety. We pray for those in civic leadership during this time of unrest and racial reckoning, that they will use their authority for the good of all.George Floyd’s tragic death has prompted a national reckoning on racial injustice, and rightfully so. Because of what the world witnessed, the will and awareness needed to bring change — in our institutions, our culture, our politics and yes, our hearts — is on the rise, and we give thanks to God for this glimmer of light in the shadow of suffering.Together we will find a way forward toward a more just society and God’s dream for us of beloved community. May God have mercy on us all, and order our steps in the ways of justice and peace.Los Angeles Bishop John Harvey TaylorMost of all, may today’s verdict affirming that Derek Chauvin murdered George Floyd enable Mr. Floyd’s family and friends to receive some measure of comfort and peace. I invite all in the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles to keep them in our prayers as well as the people of Minneapolis and all who have been victims of racism and oppression.After Mr. Floyd’s murder in May 2020, tens of millions all over the United States raised their voices in outrage because of this and more instances of unjust police violence against Black people and other people of color. Millions said as one: “Black Lives Matter.” The road to reform will be longer than we might wish, as Daunte Wright’s April 11 killing in Brooklyn Center made so heartbreakingly clear. Yet both in the media and in the courtroom, many representatives of law enforcement deplored former officer Chauvin’s actions. May their witness signal a turning point for our country as we devise models of law enforcement rooted in wholeness, healing, safety, and justice for all.In our diocese, the Bishop’s Commission on Gospel Justice and Community Safety has taken as its mission to articulate a Christ-centered vision of community safety, assess the relationship between residents and law enforcement in our neighborhoods in all six counties, and advocate for reform locally, regionally, and nationally. Please keep the commission in your prayers tonight during our fifth monthly meeting, and our first with Sister Patricia Sarah Terry as chair, including by using the prayer Presiding Bishop Michael Curry commended to the church this afternoon:O God, you have bound us together in a common life. Help us, in the midst of our struggles for justice and truth, to confront one another without hatred or bitterness, and to work together with mutual forbearance and respect; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.Vermont Bishop Shannon MacVean-BrownThanks to a brave young woman with a cell phone camera, the world saw Derek Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd’s neck until Mr. Floyd died. And yet, when I heard the news that Chauvin had been convicted of murder today, it felt surreal. There have been so many other times when we have watched a Black man, a Black woman, a Black child, suffer and die at the hands of a police officer. And there have been so many times I have allowed myself to believe that the perpetrators would be held accountable. But they never were.That changed today. I am grateful for that. But I want you to join me in contemplating how strange it is to be thankful that one man was convicted of murdering another. Accountability is essential, yet we must work toward a world in which a man like Derek Chauvin never again thinks it is okay for him to kneel on George Floyd’s neck, a world in which no one will ever think it is right to do such violence to another child of God.When I spoke to my brother this afternoon about preparing to hear this news, I told him I was feeling numb in the midst of the apprehension. He sent me the link to Nina Simone’s classic song, “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free.” “I wish I knew how it would feel to be free,” she sings. “I wish I could break all the chains holdin’ me.” That was what I needed to crack through the numbness.I am always hopeful, especially during this Easter season, that resurrection is right there around the corner—no matter how distant it might seem. With this verdict, I feel that maybe, finally, we might be able to get on with the racial reckoning that lies ahead of us as a nation. My prayer is that we face into this work and do not turn back. Because it will not be easy, and it will not be quick. But for today, at least, it feels as though progress is possible, and we have taken a first step toward the kind of reconciliation that leads to Beloved Community in which everyone knows how it feels to be free.My prayers are with the jurors, with George Floyd’s family and with the entire community of the Twin Cities.Arizona Bishop Jennifer ReddallToday a jury found ex-Minneapolis Police Department Officer Derek Chauvin guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter for killing George Floyd last year.This verdict fills me with both grief and relief. It cannot give Mr. Floyd back his life. Nor does it completely restore faith in a justice system that has not held many other law enforcement officials accountable for the deaths of men and women of color in their custody. I believe that God desires a world in which my siblings of color no longer need to justly fear their interactions with police; and where police are able to recognize their shared humanity with those they are sworn to protect and serve.A unanimous jury has agreed that Mr. Floyd’s life did not need to be lost; that excessive violence is not protected by a badge of service; and that Mr. Floyd’s life mattered to each one of those jurors enough to convict Mr. Chauvin. In that, I find some relief.Texas Bishop Andrew DoyleLike many of you in the Episcopal Diocese of Texas, in Texas, and across the country we watched and waited for the verdict in the Derek Chauvin Case. In some way the verdict reveals who we are, and gives us a glimpse of who we might hope to become. It also begins to reveal what we believe what is not acceptable force against one another – especially in regards to the police.The jury decided that George Floyd was unnecessarily killed at the hands of a police officer. We need to ponder that for a moment.This is not the first trial though nor I fear will it or should it be the last. There have been many others even more recently than George Floyd.Whom shall we name? Duante Wright, Javier Ambler, Breonna Taylor, Stephon Clark, Philando Castile, Alton Sterling, Walter Scott, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Matthew Dean, Jamee Johnson, Botham Shem Jean, E. J. Bradford, Antwon Rose, and Adam Toledo. Who else might we name?I am mindful that in the first three months of 2021 there were 213 fatal police shootings of people of color. Black people are stopped and killed at a higher rate than any other race or ethnicity.There is much to grieve, and much work still to be undertaken.I pray that we will lean towards each other in this moment as a country, state, and diocese. Let us pray for our dead ones, the family, the friends and the losses of fathers, brothers, sons, daughters, mothers, and sisters. Let us lift up the untold burden these deaths have cost families and our society.The sin of racism is a very real burden for our American society. It is writ large at moments like this. We cannot shy away from reform and our work that remains before us.Who we are in this moment will in the end speak a new chapter of our life together into being. We must continue to work toward police reform and a rebirth of humanity and compassion for others. Only then, will we no longer have to mourn and protest such senseless acts of violence and hatred.Although Derek Chauvin was found guilty, there is no reason for celebration. This is still a somber moment. As some say, the service has ended, our service begins. Let our service on behalf of each other begin. Let thy kingdom come and thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.New York Bishop Andrew DietscheEditor’s note: Joint statement with Bishop Suffragan Allen Shin and Bishop Assistant Mary Glasspool released before the verdicts. We write to you during the hours in which we and all Americans await the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial for the killing of George Floyd. We have been here before. Waiting and watching as juries deliberate is the way in which we as citizens most directly engage the judicial process, and the stakes are always high. In a real sense, every case and every verdict puts our judicial system again to the test, and the issuing of verdicts makes a witness to the quality of justice in America before the whole world. That is manifestly true in this case. The killing of George Floyd precipitated protests across the United States and across the world. The trial of Derek Chauvin is as grave as any we have ever seen. Now we watch to witness and assess the capacity of the American judicial system to meet the need which all people have for justice. African Americans particularly have lived with the long experience of seeing the courts fail them again and again and by those failures devalue their lives and losses. Whatever the verdict, there will be an aftermath.This case and this verdict matter. What comes now will go to the heart of how we remember and honor the life and the death of George Floyd. But it is our prayer that, whatever verdict comes, we may as a people remain steadfast in our commitment to work for racial justice. Let us pray for the safety of all people in the hours and days to come. In the Diocese of New York, our commitment to racial justice remains absolute. We believe that the charge to care for the poor and oppressed, to proclaim the equality and dignity of all people, and to work tirelessly for the reconciliation of people is at the heart of gospel justice. And we believe that the civil and human rights work of this diocese is inseparable from the Christian faith we embrace and the Lord who calls us into a shared common life. We do not know what will come in the days ahead. Nevertheless we are committed, and we call you, to work for peace, to never return evil for evil, to never flag in our commitment to justice, especially to racial justice, and to honor the life we share as Christians and Episcopalians across our two hundred churches. Whatever comes, let us recommit to our work on reparations for slavery and on anti-racism education, and strive for the justice and peace commended to us by Christ, that we may go forward together, as one people, brave and strong and faithful for the work we have been given to do.Pittsburgh Bishop Dorsey McConnellEditor’s note: Statement released before the verdicts.The trial of Derek Chauvin will likely conclude in the coming days. Whatever the result, we may see a familiar pattern. The verdict will be announced. There will be a public reaction, which will include statements from bishops of the Church. If the verdict is seen to accomplish some measure of justice, there may be muted praise; if not, there will be protest. In any case, there should be lamentation that such a trial needed to be held at all, that deaths of unarmed Black men and other people of color at the hands of police continue to occur with a frequency that shows no sign of abating.If there is a single word we need to hear in this season of the Resurrection, if there is one essential fact established by the reality of the Empty Tomb, it is this: God does not wait for the world to come to its senses before He acts decisively to establish His Kingdom. The inauguration of His reign of justice does not depend on the decisions of earthly courts. He did not wait for Herod to be replaced, or for Pilate to be recalled to Rome; the Cross and Resurrection did not depend on the hope that some future Caesar might bring about a kinder, gentler, more just empire.God acted in and through Jesus Christ, and in doing so, God achieved for us absolute victory over sin and death. This is the reality those who believe in Christ now know. This is the Kingdom we call home, even as we continue to dwell in this world.I do not believe that the historic tragedy of racism in this country will be ended by any verdict in any trial. All I know is that, for Christians, our calling and our work will be the same next Sunday as it was last Sunday: to love, teach and heal.We will still be called to stand for and with the oppressed and to love the oppressor, to call attention to systemic sin and work to correct the structures that promote it, to critique any manifestation of human supremacy, which always seeks to supplant the supremacy of Christ and Christ’s Kingdom. No matter the verdict, this call and this work do not change.So, let us not be distracted. Pray for all who continue to mourn the death of George Floyd, and pray as well for the man who killed him. Move more deeply into the world to build bridges with those who have suffered under the burden of racism over generations, and join them in the ongoing work of healing our society from this curse. Help those charged with the enforcement of law in our democracy to become fully what we know, at their best, they can be. And pray constantly that the will of the Father may be done on earth as it is in heaven.As we continue to walk this road together, let us find our strength and our hope in the power of the risen Christ, who always goes before us.San Diego Bishop Susan Brown SnookNearly a year ago, George Floyd died in Minneapolis, during a prolonged confrontation with a police officer – a death that sparked protest movements across the country. Today, the police officer was found guilty of his murder. It is a verdict that has been awaited with both dread and anticipation, as the events of the past year have recalled the long history of racial injustice and inequality in this country.We Christians take a baptismal vow to “strive for justice and peace among all people, and respect the dignity of every human being.” While a verdict may be thought of as one way justice is done, ultimately the work of justice requires all of us working together to ensure that we can build a peaceful and just society. We hope for a world in which people of color do not fear that interactions with police or others will lead to their deaths. We work toward a world in which all people can work, live, and socialize in a world that appreciates their diversity rather than holding certain groups back because their diversity is not appreciated or understood. We pray for a world in which people of all skin tones and ethnic backgrounds can live in justice and peace.True justice will come as all of us live into our baptismal vow to work toward a peaceful and just society. Such a society will require systemic change, when those of us with historic power and privilege take an honest look at the systems that have held so many back in our country, and take active steps to transform those systems. In our diocese, many of us have started the process that leads toward transformation through programs such as Sacred Ground. The work continues with the Racial Justice Task Force that our Co-Missioners for Peace and Justice, The Rev. Rebecca Dinovo and Deann Rios are helping to create.This verdict does not bring George Floyd back to life. I invite you to pray for the repose of his soul and for comfort for his family. And I hope you will join me in committing to the work of racial reconciliation, one of the three mission priorities of The Episcopal Church (along with evangelism and care of creation). As Presiding Bishop Michael Curry said in a statement earlier today, “May we not be paralyzed by our pain, our fear, and our anger. May we learn, as the Bible teaches, to ‘love not in word and speech but in truth and in action,’ truth and action that leads to justice and healing.”O God, you have bound us together in a common life. Help us, in the midst of our struggles for justice and truth, to confront one another without hatred or bitterness, and to work together with mutual forbearance and respect; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.New Jersey Bishop William H. StokesIt appears that justice has been done in the decision of a jury to find former Police Officer Derek Chauvin guilty of all three counts with which he was charged. He is a convicted felon, guilty of the murder of George Floyd. As a nation, we can find some satisfaction that our system worked in this instance. Nonetheless, we must all recognize that we are a long way from having a just society. There is much work still in front of us. The verdict today does not bring George Floyd back to life. His family and community will continue to suffer the deep pain of loss. Moreover, the verdict does not make up for the times, too numerous to count, when justice has not been done for Black and Brown people in this country. Consider Daunte Wright, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Rayshard Brooks, Breonna Taylor, Atatiana Jefferson, Elijah McClain, Tamir Rice. The verdict today does not cleanse this nation of the systemic racism and White Supremacy that is so deeply embedded in our nation’s history and on-going life, a fact which continues to make life miserable and dangerous for a significant portion of our citizenry who suffer from injustice each and every day.The stated mission of the Church, indeed God’s mission, is “to restore all people to unity with God and one another in Christ” (Book of Common Prayer, p. 855). The jury decision in the Derek Chauvin case offers us a unique opportunity as a church to engage in God’s work of justice and healing. I pray that we will all commit ourselves to this sacred work and pledge ourselves to strive for justice and peace among all people as our baptismal promises command us to do.O God, you have bound us together in a common life. Help us, in the midst of our struggles for justice and truth, to confront one another without hatred or bitterness, and to work together with mutual forbearance and respect; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.Michigan Bishop Bonnie A. PerryFormer police officer Derek Chauvin has been found guilty of murdering Mr. George Floyd.A moment of justice has occurred: Mr. Floyd’s death has been neither excused nor ignored. Many will welcome this verdict as a long overdue act of official accountability and humanity. Other people may respond to this verdict with lingering questions and concerns. As people of faith we are called to listen to all people and to do exactly as the prophet Micah said: “To do justice, love mercy and to walk humbly with our God.”To do justice, we too must act. The young woman who took out her phone and filmed Mr. Floyd’s arrest, ensured that the world would have visual evidence of Officer Chauvin’s actions. What actions are we being called to take to create a more just world?To love mercy, we must listen and learn. To whom are we being called to listen?To walk humbly with our God, we dare not shy away from the divisive, difficult issues of our day, particularly those that involve systemic racism.We are the people God is calling to create a more perfect union in our country. Our ministry of reconciling love, our ministry of loving our neighbors as ourselves, our ministry of respecting the dignity of every human being, begins again today.We have much to do and we have been given many gifts to use. Let us build on this moment of accountability with deep prayer and focused action.Tonight, I invite your prayers for the community of Minneapolis, for the family members of Mr. Floyd and Mr. Chauvin, and for all who are grieving or feel unheard.May all of us who feel exhaustion, joy, frustration, anger or even guilt be filled with God’s boundless love. May our hearts be comforted and know that God working through us can do infinitely more than we can ask or imagine and may we experience tonight the peace of Christ which passes all understanding.On Tuesday, May 25, 2021 at 8:00 p.m., our diocese will gather with dioceses throughout the country for a service of remembrance for Mr. George Floyd. I hope that you will save this time and date. Detailed information will be shared in upcoming days.As the night falls on Minneapolis, the state of Minnesota and our nation, let us all continue to pray.Southwestern Virginia Bishop MarkBourlakasOf the many statements since Derek Chauvin was declared guilty on the multiple counts of the murder of George Floyd, Minnesota AG Keith Ellison’s was one of the more compelling. In his press conference following the guilty verdict, Ellison said, “I would not call today’s verdict “justice” … because justice implies true restoration. But it is accountability, which is the first step towards justice. And now the cause of justice is in your hands. And when I say your hands, I mean the hands of the people of the United States.”We are, of course, thankful that Derek Chauvin was held accountable for his heinous actions, especially when there has been so little accountability for violent crimes perpetrated against people of color in this country’s history. However, Ellison’s comment that “justice implies true restoration” must be the central focus of our ongoing work as disciples of the Risen Christ. True restoration is about every child of God enjoying the same degree of equality and freedom. And Ellison is right that the cause of justice is in our hands. The painful reality and ongoing experience for far too many is that justice is not a condition that miraculously appears. Chauvin was held accountable because people courageously came together to speak up and witness against an injustice. Only when we put our hearts, minds and hands into consistently striving for true restorative justice will we create the kind of beloved community that God desires for all people.At the synagogue in Nazareth, Jesus defined the agenda of his mission as he read from the book of the prophet Isaiah:“The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed, to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord.” (Luke 4:18)Jesus’ agenda of justice, healing and peace must be the Church’s agenda. Accountability is one of the first steps. Let us pray for God’s Holy Spirit to support, guide and strengthen us for the work ahead.Maryland Bishop Eugene Taylor SuttonOn Weariness: A Reflection on the George Floyd Trialby the Right Rev. Eugene Taylor SuttonFor the Gathering of the Clergy & Lay Leaders of the Diocese of MarylandWednesday, April 21, 2021 – 10:00 AMMatthew 11:25-30 – Feast of Anselm of CanterburyJesus said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him. Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”On May 25, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, George Floyd, an unemployed black man was arrested on suspicion of passing a counterfeit $20 bill for a pack of cigarettes at a corner market. He panicked, pleaded that he was claustrophobic and struggled with police when they tried to put him in a squad car. They put him on the ground instead. There, a white police officer kneeled on the neck of the handcuffed Floyd, pinning him to the ground while he begged for his life up until his last breath. “They gonna kill me. They gonna kill me, man,” he said when the officers tried to get him into the car.For the last nine minutes of his life, George Floyd cried out 27 times, “I can’t breathe,” and eventually said, “My neck. I’m through. I’m through.”“My stomach hurt. My neck hurts. Everything hurts,” Floyd cried out, his face pushed against the pavement. “Give me some water or something, please.”The policeman was Derek Chauvin, whom Floyd referred to respectfully as “Mr. Officer.” Floyd said to him and to anyone who could help him: “Can’t believe this, man. Mom, love you. Love you.” And his final words were “Tell my kids I love them. I’m dead.” All the while, the officer still pressed his knee on George Floyd’s neck until he died.Yesterday, a jury convicted Derek Chauvin on three counts of murder. Many were celebrating that verdict as a triumph of justice; but I could not. Although I and perhaps – perhaps – most other Americans were relieved that those jurors trusted what they saw and heard when presented with the evidence, we still could not burst out into an exuberant celebration.Why? Quite simply, because we’re tired.When it comes to the killing of unarmed black people by the very ones who are supposed to protect and serve, we’ve been down this road too many times. Out of the thousands of deadly police shootings in the U.S. since 2005, fewer than 140 officers have been charged with murder or manslaughter, according to data found by Prof. Phil Stinson, a criminologist at Bowling Green State University. Before yesterday, only seven were convicted of murder.We’re tired of black persons being treated as if our lives mattered less. We’ve been down that road too many times, in too many situations to be thought of as isolated incidents, or that somehow these human beings “deserved” their destiny with violent death.Shall we say their names? How much time do you have? Among the thousands of unarmed black men and women who were killed by the police in the past decade – including dozens since the George Floyd trial began on March 29 – we remember Daunte Wright, Adam Toledo, Ahmaud Arbery, David McAtee, Dreasjon Reed, Michael Ramos, Breonna Taylor, Manuel Ellis, Atatiana Jefferson, Philando Castile, Alton Sterling, Betty “Boo” Jones, Sandra Bland, Walter Scott, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and here in Baltimore City, Freddie Gray.Even when the indignities don’t result in death, we’re tired of constantly having to be on our guard against the possibility of unwarranted arrests and incarceration. We weren’t surprised at all when the woman in Central Park in New York City, after being challenged by a male birdwatcher to “follow the rules” of the park and contain her dog, instead called the police and said, “A black man is threatening me in the park.” She knew what she was doing; she knew the code. The phrase “a black man” was the signal that she, a white woman, was in immediate danger, and that the police would come and arrest him, taking her word against his that he should be considered a threat, and thus removed from society. Yes, she, who was shown by the man’s video on his cell phone to be the aggressor in that situation, would be considered innocent, and another black life would end up in jail. Or in the morgue.We know that we need good policing in our communities. We honor and respect those police officers and other first responders who put their lives on the line every day to serve and protect us. The overwhelming majority of them are good people, and we pray for their safety and the courage to perform their duties for the common good. But we need them also to have the courage to call out and challenge the racist language and practices of the few that mar the good name of the many faithful servants – much like so many did in the George Floyd trial, including the Minneapolis Police Chief and several other officers.Meanwhile, black and brown people are tired. People of goodwill everywhere, all over the world, of every race and ethnic group who have an ounce of compassion and a sense of justice, are tired of this. We’ve grown weary.If the George Floyd murder were an isolated incident, we could chalk it up to “it’s just a bad cop, Bishop Sutton. Get over it.” But no, we know the script. We know the pattern in America that’s been woven into the fabric of our society for 400 years. We know the insidious and evil hold that white supremacy has over the minds of all of us – all of us – and it makes us sick. We are just bone tired; most certainly in the black community, and increasingly that’s true for all of us.Do black lives matter as much as white lives in our nation? You tell me…but before you do, do your homework. Come to that discussion with some evidence that as a good, responsible citizen you’ve actually studied our history, and you’ve come with facts about where we are today in terms of housing, education, the justice system, health care, employment equity and wealth.Do Asian lives matter as much as white lives in our nation? You tell me, but come with some facts about the levels of bigotry and violence directed against Asians and Pacific Islanders in our land.Do Latino, Native American, darker-skinned immigrants and refugee lives matter in our nation as much as white lives? You tell me…but speak to me not just how you want it to be, but how it actually is.In other words, I’m weary of the lies, self-deception and blindness to how life really is for the “least, the last and the left” out in America. I’m 67 years old, and the weariness of still having to convince far too many of my white brothers and sisters that we have a real problem here with implicit bias and blindness to their own white privilege just gets to me sometimes.So yesterday, although relieved at the verdict in this one case, I could not celebrate. Just as several Floyd family members said last night, I can breathe now more easily, but I cannot dance in free flowing exuberance. Emotionally, I can’t afford the luxury of believing that everything’s going to be alright now, that everyone is “woke”, and that there are only bright days ahead of us. Instead, last night I wept – going to bed fatigued and exhausted.But this morning, I’m still faced with today’s gospel reading: “Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.” (Matthew 11:28-30)My friends, if you, like me are just plain tired of it all, then maybe these words of our Lord will find a special place in your souls today. For it’s true: Americans have been carrying a heavy burden of racist ideology and behaviors for far too long. It’s weighing us down. The heaviness of the sin of racism prevents us from fully entering into God’s vision for how we ought to be within ourselves, and with each other. We need to get out from under that yoke; it’s literally making us crazy. We need to learn from Jesus a new way of being; we need some gentleness and humility, we need some rest for our souls.But to achieve that rest, we need to be willing to take on the yoke that Christ places on us. Most people know that a yoke is that wooden bar or frame by which two animals (such as oxen) are joined at the heads or necks so that they can move together, go forward together, work together.The yoke that Jesus places on us isn’t burdensome; it’s the allegorical reminder that we can’t do the work we’re given to do alone. It’s easier when we are yoked together.In many versions of the Bible Jesus calls his yoke “easy”, but that’s an unfortunate translation. It makes it sound like everything’s light and clear-cut, that very little effort or energy is required to do the work. But that’s just not true. The New English Bible’s translation is better, it has Jesus saying “My yoke is good to bear.”The point is not that the Lord’s yoke asks nothing of us. Rather the point is that it fits, it’s the right size, so it works. It leads to getting the job done without falling down in weariness and exhaustion. It’s good to bear. It leads to life. It’s what led the Diocese of Maryland to do the good hard work of anti-racism, racial reconciliation and reparations for at least the last twenty years. The yoke of Christ enables us to labor together in God’s vineyard to bear the fruit of the Spirit’s harvest: “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.” (Galatians 5:22-23)So our prayer this day after the George Floyd trial is:Come, Lord Jesus. Don’t abandon us in this time of our collective weariness. Put your yoke upon our collective shoulders – the yoke of justice, of mercy, of compassion and love for all. Give us the same burden for all our brothers and sisters that you have. Cause us to work together to do the work you’ve given us to do. And then, Lord Jesus, grant us your rest. Amen.Newark Bishop Carlye J. HughesThe guilty verdict delivered in the Chauvin trial elicited a range of reactions revealing our complex history and relationship with racism and racial violence. Relief, sadness, exhaustion, triumph, shock, and grief were only some of the responses that intermingled within us and so many other people across the nation.The decision was a historic act of accountability for the loss of a Black man’s life – something we have seen precious little of through decades of lynching, terror, and brutality. These dangers have been felt so strongly in African American communities that “the talk” has become a normal and necessary part of growing up Black in our country. Important to note that “the talk” is a misnomer and is not limited to one group of people. These conversations start in childhood, continue throughout life, and take place in many communities of color.As is often the case with complex issues, people with no experience of this danger are surprised to know it exists or deny all evidence of a problem. This year of pandemic has been a year of deep discovery about the pernicious and insidious nature of racism and its impact on the nation, the church, and each of us as faithful Christians. It is this learning that has sharpened our efforts to develop our spiritual lives, to learn our history, and to gather with faithful people to take action. Our work continues.Even with the sense of deep relief many experienced with this decision, we recognize this was only a start. We have been given a taste of justice. If we want more than a taste, then it will take sustained commitment, tenacious effort, and an abundance of God’s love and healing to become Beloved Community. Holy Scripture and the Book of Common Prayer call us to love our neighbor. This call guides us to a life where all people are loved, valued, respected, safe, and thrive.Our prayers continue for the Floyd and Chauvin families, for all victims and perpetrators of racial violence, and for Beloved Community to become the realized dream for all of God’s people.Prayer for the Human Family, BCP p 815O God, you made us in your own image and redeemed us through Jesus your Son: Look with compassion on the whole human family; take away the arrogance and hatred which infect our hearts; break down the walls that separate us; unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that, in your good time, all nations and races may serve you in harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA George Floyd Statements, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

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CCR1 Residence / Wernerfield

first_imgProject gallerySee allShow lessHow I Developed Ergo Kiwi, an Ergonomic Craft Knife that Your Fingers Will Thank You…ArticlesOMA to Renovate Berlin’s Historic KaDeWe Department StoreArchitecture News Share ArchDaily CCR1 Residence / Wernerfield Emily Summers Design Associates United States CCR1 Residence / WernerfieldSave this projectSaveCCR1 Residence / Wernerfield Houses Projects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/780510/ccr1-residence-wernerfield-wernerfield Clipboard CopyHouses•United States Save this picture!© Justin Clemons+ 22 Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/780510/ccr1-residence-wernerfield-wernerfield Clipboardcenter_img photographs:  Justin Clemons, Robert YuPhotographs:  Justin Clemons, Robert Yu, Landscape Design: Country:United StatesMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Robert YuRecommended ProductsWindowsAir-LuxSliding Window – CurvedWindowsKalwall®Facades – Window ReplacementsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAText description provided by the architects. The CCR1 Residence is located on a beautiful wooded site on Cedar Creek Reservoir. The project program included the design of a main residence, guest pavilion, storage barn and various ancillary architectural features. The goal of the design was to provide an artful and low maintenance retreat that would blend in with the site.Save this picture!© Robert YuSave this picture!Floor PlanSave this picture!© Justin ClemonsA slender floor plan design allowed for the buildings to be woven carefully through the dense forest of pine trees that were planted by the owner on the property as a child. An L-shape plan was utilized to create a rear courtyard area that would provide refuge from the strong lake winds. The orientation of the floor plan responds directly to the original pier axis and is an overall site control datum. Features such as the long entry drive stone wall and entry door align with this axis.Save this picture!© Justin ClemonsA simple palette of concrete, steel, teak & glass were used for their enduring and visually discreet qualities. The entire project was limited to a single story with the exception of the playful treehouse feature designed as retreat for the family children. Large expanses of sliding glass walls throughout the project allow for a strong connection to the outdoors and for landscape elements such as a sunken bocce court and fire pit courtyard to become integral to the architecture. In this sense the interior space can also serve as porches, true to the client’s original desire. Hocker Design Group “COPY” “COPY” Area:  4690 ft² Area:  4690 ft² Photographs Architects: Wernerfield Area Area of this architecture project Interior Design: CopyAbout this officeWernerfieldOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesUnited StatesPublished on January 19, 2016Cite: “CCR1 Residence / Wernerfield” 19 Jan 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Classic™ SeriesVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ AbstractFaucetshansgroheKitchen Mixers – Talis MShower ColumnsAXORShowers – AXOR LampShower by NendoWoodBruagRoom Acoustics – Interior Cladding PanelsPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesIsland Exterior FabricatorsMega-Panel Facade SystemsConcreteKrytonCrystalline Waterproofing – KIMTable LampsAxolightTable Lights – SkirtDoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Glass Pivot Door – Rabel 8700 Slim Super ThermalUrban ShadingPunto DesignPublic Architecture in Residential ComplexExterior DeckingHouse of BambooDecking – BambooAnti-Corrosive CoatingsTIGERPowder Coating – Drylac® Bianco 605More products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?美国德州CCR1 住宅 / Wernerfield是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Winners of 32nd Arts & Business Awards announced

first_img Howard Lake | 18 November 2010 | News Winners of 32nd Arts & Business Awards announced Tagged with: Awards corporate Classic FM has won an award from Arts & Business for their partnership with Royal Liverpool Philharmonic which has increased the size of their live classical audiences by thousands.The partnership began in 2001 and has “outstripped both partners’ expectations” according to Arts & Business, which presented it with the BP A&B Sustained Partnership Award. The flagship ‘Classic FM Orchestra in North West England’ brand is now well established in the region and innovative promotions continue to drive audience numbers.Initiatives such as ‘test drive’ classical music campaigns have made free tickets available for first time attendees, significant numbers of which have returned as ticket buyers. As a result of the increased national profile from the partnership, the Liverpool Philharmonic has increased leverage with donors, sponsors and key funding partners.Nine awards were announced at a ceremony this evening attended by the Minister for Culture and 400 leaders in business and the arts, hosted by the Museum of London.Colin Tweedy, Chief Executive of Arts & Business, said: “Businesses who invest time and resources over a period of time to an arts partner reap the rewards tenfold. Bravo to Classic FM and Royal Liverpool Philharmonic for showing how a long-standing partnership can bring such powerful benefits to both.”Mrs Des Violaris, Director UK Arts & Culture, BP said: “When cultural partnerships are nurtured, challenged and developed over time, their relationship gives both organisations an edge. Particularly in these challenging times, I applaud the commitment shown by Classic FM and Royal Liverpool Philharmonic.”Michael Eakin, Chief Executive of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, said: “10 years on and our partnership with Classic FM is still evolving. It has given the Liverpool Philharmonic a consistent national profile and has encouraged a deepening of involvement in our music.”The other winners were:· Jaguar Land Rover A&B Community & Young People Award: Ekspan & Open Door Theatre· Lloyd’s A&B Business Innovation Award: Travelex & National Theatre· Prudential A&B People Development Award: Siemens Plc & Hallé Concerts Society· Prudential A&B Board Member of the Year Award: John Middleton & The Broadway· Telegraph Media Group A&B Cultural Branding Award: HSBC & The British Museum· Classic FM A&B International Award: HSBC & The British Museum· The Garrett Award: Vanessa Swann, Chief Executive, Cockpit Arts· The Simon Hornby Award: Sky Artswww.artsandbusiness.org.uk  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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30 years of the Institute of Fundraising

first_img Howard Lake | 25 March 2013 | News Advertisement The Institute of Fundraising was founded 30 years ago today. Its chief executive Peter Lewis summarises what it has achieved for charities and what more it can be doing.[youtube height=”450″ width=”800″]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=872P6DcUBZw[/youtube] 30 years of the Institute of Fundraising  17 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Institute of Fundraising AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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