Tag: 南京桑拿

Football Friday at Primedia

first_imgFootball Fridays took over the Johannesburg office of Primedia on Friday 11 September, with the staff of Talk Radio 702, Cape Talk and 94.7 Highveld Stereo showing their true South Africa 2010 colours!Paul Bannister, acting CEO of the International Marketing Council of South Africa, with Talk Radio 702’s John Robbie. (Photo: Brand South Africa)If the cap fits, wear it! (Or if you can’t play it, display it!) (Photo: Brand South Africa) View the full photoset on FlickrShare your own Football Friday thoughts, photos and videos Posted on SouthAfrica.info on 14 September 2009.last_img read more

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Geocaching.com Caption Contest 33 – Win a Barely Coveted Prize

first_imgWINNING CAPTION: “But that’s not all, if you order your Lackey’s Press-on Nails in the next five minutes, we’ll send you this authentic Signal geocoin!”-nemocamaroEnter your best caption for this picture to win a ‘barely coveted prize’ in the 33rd installment of our Geocaching.com Caption Contest. This picture was originally posted on the official Geocaching.com Facebook page. Special thanks to geocacher Alison Duhamel for use of the picture.What caption would you write for the picture at the top of this post? “The geocache probably should have seen this one coming.”Barely Coveted PrizeSubmit your caption by clicking on “Comments” below. Please include your Geocaching.com username in all entries. Then, explore the captions other geocachers have posted.You’re encouraged to try to ‘influence’ the voting process (*nudge*nudge*). “Like” the caption that you think should win. If you think your caption should win, convince your fellow geocachers, your friends, and family to “like” your caption. Lackeys vote from the top finalists to decide the winner of the contest.Click on the image to see the winning caption of this contest SharePrint RelatedGeocaching.com Caption Contest 34 – Win a Barely Coveted PrizeJune 10, 2012In “Lackeys”Geocaching Caption Contest 37 – Win a Barely Coveted PrizeJanuary 6, 2013In “Community”Geocaching.com Caption Contest 32 – Win a Barely Coveted PrizeMarch 13, 2012In “Community” The winner receives this month’s vintage ‘barely coveted prize.” It’s a medium sized t-shirt from a 2010 geocaching event organized by Lackeys. It celebrates the 25th anniversary of the movie Goonies.Click on the image to see the winning caption of this contestMore than two dozen Lackeys voted to award the winner of the 32nd Geocaching.com Caption Contest a barely coveted prize. It was winter-themed – and coincidentally the voting took place on May 4th. [The joke goes, “May the 4th be with you.”] Perhaps not so coincidentally, a Star Wars-themed caption won. Click on the image at right to discover the winning caption from the last Geocaching.com Caption Contest.Explore all the past winning captions by checking out all the Geocaching.com Caption Contests. If you have suggestions for Geocaching.com Caption Contest photos, send a message and the image to [email protected] with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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Are Ductless Minisplits Overpriced?

first_imgGreen Basics: Ductless Minisplit Heat PumpsRules of Thumb for Ductless MinisplitsHow To Buy a Ductless MinisplitDare to DIY A Minisplit Install?Installing a Ductless Minisplit SystemJust Two Minisplits Heat and Cool the Whole HouseMinisplit Heat Pumps and Zero-Net-Energy HomesLoving My Minisplits Ductless Minisplits May Not Be As Efficient As We Thought You’re paying for less riskThe question has come up before, GBA senior editor Martin Holladay points out, when Justin Fink, the editor of Fine Homebuilding magazine posted a question about installing a minisplit himself when he renovated his garage shop. That was back in 2013.“If you pay for installation by a qualified contractor, you are paying for warranty service and future callbacks,” Holladay adds. “You are also ensuring that Mitsubishi doesn’t void the equipment warranty because of an installation error.”Ben Balcombe suggests there’s more to a higher-than-expected estimate from a small company than Peter might realize.“Like many, I’ve been through these thoughts and discussions about how an $1,800 unit can cost $4,000 installed,” Balcombe says. “Personally, I work for a company that employs [about] 20,000 people, so I have no experience in the costs of running a small business, but when you actually step back and think about all the costs that a small HVAC company has to incur, you quickly get to big numbers.”That includes wages, taxes, real estate, the purchase and maintenance of work vehicles, training, liability insurance, and medical insurance.“All of that is included in the price,” he says. “It’s not that Bobby HVAC is pocketing $2K for a couple of hours’ work that you could do yourself. If I was working out my budget for a project I would look to do the ‘easy stuff’ myself (framing, painting, basic plumbing, and electrical) and use what I save there to pay for a pro to install a minisplit.” The installer is offering an outdated unitDana Dorsett checks the details of Peter’s original post and offers this thought: the Mr. Slim minisplit included in the quote is a 10-year-old model that has been discontinued. “You don’t want it,” he says.A new model, Mitsubishi’s FH12NA, “has a significant efficiency advantage over the FE12, which would only be sold by third-party remainder and surplus houses these days, not standard Mitsubishi distributors, though you can still get repair parts for them,” Dorsett says.Dorsett says that in his area, the FH12 would cost about $4,000. “I’d only consider installing an FE12 if it came in under $3,000,” he says.“If you’re using it primarily for AC, note that the FH tests a SEER 26+, whereas the FE is SEER 23, which is still a double-digit percentage difference, if not quite as much as the heating efficiency delta,” Dorsett says. “Of course, unless you did an aggressive Manual J — well enough to have a real handle on the heating and cooling loads — there’s no way to know if either of those models is appropriate for your house/zone.”Wait a little longer, an anonymous poster tells Peter, and you’ll be able to buy an even more efficient Mr. Cool minisplit — and one that includes a warranty for DIY installation.“The Mr. Cool DIY series comes with a warranty for DIY,” the poster says. “And by the way, minisplit costs about $50 (US) to install in China. You can get in the U.S. a Midea 24,000 Btu/h unit for $1,300, 20 SEER. Oh, Midea [has] got a 40 SEER (yes, 40 SEER) unit coming out this year, and it should be dirt cheap, too.“More kids should get into the HVAC business instead of college,” the post adds. “Easy money.” Smart plan or not? That’s the topic for this Q&A Spotlight. The answer depends on system complexityJimmy Black says he’s probably saving a couple of thousand dollars by helping a local contractor install a 3-ton, two-head ductless Midea system, but the potential savings of doing the whole job himself weren’t that enticing.“I priced doing the system myself, but by the time you add up all of the ductwork (I have some custom pieces), lines, and time involved I was well into $4-$5,000,” Black writes. “Not to mention that simply troubleshooting any problems is going to cost you big bucks, since you have to evacuate the whole line set for many issues. Expect $200-$400 per service call.“I’m spending the extra to make sure it’s done correctly, but mostly to have a 24/7, no questions asked, 10-year warranty.”If he had installed the system himself, he might still be covered by the manufacturer’s warranty, but then had to ship a defective unit back and wait for a replacement to arrive. “In Florida, 2-3 weeks without AC is not an option,” he adds. “I also wish to never again mess with maintenance after my renovation is done. I’m ready to relax!”That said, if you’re installing a small, simple system — one outdoor unit and one indoor unit — do it yourself, Black says.“If you have multiple zones, you can still do DIY,” he adds. “Do several 1/1 units. That way if something goes wrong, only the one head is offline, and it will be much easier to troubleshoot, and if all else fails simply replace the unit.” Ductless minisplit heat pumps have received a tremendous amount of attention in the last several years, and Peter L. would like to include one in his own house. There’s only one problem: an estimate that seems far higher than it should.“I was quoted $4,800 to purchase and install a Mitsubishi Mr. Slim 1-ton unit (MSZFE12NA),” Peter writes at GBA’s Q&A forum. “That seems very high. Especially since it’s a new build and the 3-inch hole is already in the wall.”Installers see minisplits as a niche market, Peter says, and because they’re not making money on the ductwork that a conventional heating and cooling system would require, they are charging “crazy install prices” to make up the difference.In this case, Peter estimates that the installation should cost about $500, not the $2,000 his contractor has in mind.That makes installing the system himself an attractive option.“I might go the route of the DIY minisplit from Home Depot — Mr.Cool,” he says “I can get a 1-ton unit for $1,300 and install it myself since the refrigerant lines are pre-charged. The Mr. Cool unit (17 SEER) is not as efficient as the Mitsubishi (26 SEER) but at $1,300 for the 1-ton unit that cannot be beat. Even if it dumps out at 7 years of age, I got my money’s worth.” RELATED ARTICLES No, $2,000 is way too muchTo Tim Brown, who runs a small business himself, the $2,000 installation charge is way too much, and reflects a belief in the HVAC community that minisplits are a “cash cow” not unlike photovoltaic systems.“What I’m finding with the minisplits (at least in northwest Ontario) is [they] are new, exotic, and well outside the comfort zone that most of the companies work in. The attitude is Hey, if you really want that fancy new unit, you gotta pay whatever I ask. It is particularly true when there are only a couple of companies that have ever touched a minisplit.“I have to pull the trigger this summer on a minisplit and will install it myself before I pay what I consider a predatory rate to have a ‘pro’ do it,” Brown continues. “I can buy two units: screw up the first one/throw it away and get another for the cost of one professionally installed unit.”When Brown runs the numbers, he comes up with no more than an eight-hour day, and that includes an hour to test the system and have a cup of coffee with the customer before leaving. At most, $1,000 ought to cover it.“Just throwing that our for discussion,” he says.Brown’s claims ring a bell with Steve S., who writes that the oversized effort to get a minisplit installed in his house was simply too much.“I had five different contractors look at our project — a 1,500-square-foot, two-bedroom Cape Cod that I had just spray foam insulated, which I thought was a perfect candidate for a minisplit system, and all of them talked about how it would be better to install traditional HVAC,” he writes.“I gave up on the minisplits.” Our expert’s opinionHere’s what GBA technical director Peter Yost thinks:I checked in with a local high-performance HVAC contractor, ARC Mechanical, on the issue of affordable installation of simple ductless minisplit heat pumps. ARC completed approximately 150 minisplit heat pump installations last year, many of them for single-family homes. Alex Wilson in our shop recommended I talk with Mark Russwick, the guy he worked with on the HVAC system in his own home.Mark started off by saying that he admires anyone who likes to take on technical challenges on their own home. “It’s the Yankee in us, and I include myself this way,” said Mark. “But I think there are good reasons to go the pro route on minisplit heat pump installations, and in fact, the $4,800 total cost is not that far off the mark.”Here is what Mark laid out for me in our interview, in a really clear way:1. You need a vacuum pump. Even if the compressor and the line set come charged, you will need to purge the interior head, which will not come pre-charged. And if you don’t ensure that the entire system is pressurized with just refrigerant, you run the risk of inefficient operation and probably damage or reduction in service life of the compressor.2. These are relatively new systems and certified training ensures a warrantied install. ARC is an elite Diamond installer for Mitsubishi Electric, which means all of their installs have a 12-year warranty. “The trainings are important because these are high performance systems and the field is changing and improving really fast. Tough to stay on top of the game,” Mark stated.3. The cost of equipment is about $1,750. Mark showed me an actual invoice for a Mitsubishi 1-ton, single-zone, Hyper-Heat, including the compressor, indoor head, line set, controllers, concrete pad, and 18-inch compressor stand.Mark also showed me a spreadsheet that ARC had worked up for Green Mountain Power for ARC to complete about 200 projects. So these are quantity-discounted costs. The install included:$150 line hide, including wall inlet, two straight sections, one coupling, one end outlet, spray foam, and caulking for a standard 30-foot line length.$60 control wire and drain, at $2 per foot.$1,280 labor — two guys, five hours each at job, including travel time.$725 electrical work — 240-volt 20-amp wiring 50 feet to panel, and including code-required exterior GFI duplex service outlet (labor and materials).The total cost, Mark said, is “right around four grand.“Given the quantity-discount in our numbers and the fact that our labor rates might be lower than your GBA poster (Pacific Northwest), not as far off from $4,800 as you might expect,” he said.Finally, I checked in with mechanical engineer Bart Bales and he added an interesting perspective:“One consideration for all types of heat pumps is the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) standard test for performance conducted at 47° F. Organizations such as the Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnership (VEEP) and the Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC) are advocating for testing and Output/Coefficients of Performance (COP) for temperatures of 17° and 5° F.”last_img read more

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If data is the new oil, who is your refiner?

first_imgReadWrite Sponsors RW: We see a lot of IoT solutions pitched around the massive amount of data you have or could analyze. So to a point, if you have that data knowledge in house that’s great, but if you don’t, is there a risk of overwhelming a client and offering too many data options, do they really need that talent in house?MJ: It depends on kind of solutions you want to build, of course. And where you can do filtering and setting thresholds on some of the data, for example if you have a temperature sensor on a refrigeration installation, the only data that you actually want to get hold of are the exceptions or anomalies because if everything is normal there is no need to get overwhelmed by huge volumes of normal data. So what is important is that you do intelligent data collection and try to filter out, and pre-analyze and crunch the numbers as early as possible. To start the refinement process as close as possible to the device where the data is generated.DL: Let me share with you a view of our thinking. This is applicable to IoT as well. In short, the way we look at data intelligence is similar to a human brain. We are actually driving a notion of intelligence stack. If you think about it in terms of your own brain, there are things that have faster response time and are more autonomous. At this layer, you are processing the environment data but with a narrow scope. Now let’s draw the similarity to IoT. Things are happening on their own and when it needs some feedback adjustments, it is making an autonomous, local decision.In the next layer, there may be a moderate response time action and it is somewhat autonomous. And then there’s the upper layer that we call augmented intelligence. It serves to help the human; because at the utmost top layer it’s still the human administrator – the human executive making longer term policy changes. And that augmented layer is the top layer of the software where it’s uncovering hidden insights for the human to make better, different and longer term adjustments.So if you think of these different layers as part of a stack, even if you think about it in an IoT context, say at a factory level: the closer you are to the bottom we’re talking in terms of robotics where things are automatic. And as you go up, it’s more human; and software plays a greater role in terms of discovering insights in order for the human to make better judgements.MJ: What’s interesting is that this is also reflected at the infrastructure level. Probably you’ve heard of edge cloud or multi-access edge computing or MEC, where you are actually going to do part of the data processing as close as possible to the source. And it is for two reasons: First, you want to reduce the latency in the network, and reduce the turn-around time for decision making. Second, you don’t want to trombone all of these massive amounts of data through the core of your cloud. You only want your users and decision makers to deal with the real useful stuff. When I have to explain edge computing, I sometimes describe it as reverse CDN (content delivery network).Take a look at what we did years ago when video on demand and live streaming became popular. We were suddenly confronted with the problem that we might not have enough bandwidth to serve each user with an individual stream, and with a possible latency. So, we put caching servers closer to the end-user on which we would put the most popular content and could do some local content navigation and processing, such as fast forwarding and backward, and content adaptation. So this was downstream storage and compute resources optimization. And today we have a number of players on the internet, for example Akamai, who are making good money with such caching and optimization services.Now, if you look to the Internet of Things, the problem is not in terms of the amount of downstream data like in video but the challenge is in the number of data sources and in the volume of upstream data. Because you have a huge number of IoT devices generating a massive number of data records and what you are actually going to do is put in some kind of upstream caching service that is close to the source to collect the data, do some low level analytics and make sure that you only send information that makes sense further down the cloud for further processing and further refinement, to use the oil industry metaphor once again. And therefore I call edge computing often a kind of “reverse CDN” for it’s supplying the same kind of functions but using a different architecture and operating on flows in a different direction.RW: OK, so we’ve got someone who wants to invest in a project of whatever kind, typically someone’s got a cost savings or a new revenue stream I guess, but I think more often that not, it seems a go/no-go decision is most often driven by cost reduction or efficiency — which always has appeal in most organizations. Can you both give an example of a data driven process the can unlock not only the cost savings but maybe the decision pathway as well, like an example each?MJ: I could start with what we are doing with our video analytics solution. This is an example of an application that uses massive volumes of data streamed by e.g. closed circuit video surveillance cameras.In cities you have hundreds or thousands of these cameras that are creating huge numbers of live video streams. Generally, there is not enough staff to look at all the screens simultaneously, because it would be extremely expensive and inefficient to have people watch all these video streams 24/7. So, what Nokia’s solution does is analyze these videos and look for anomalies. There are plenty use case examples, like a car driving in the wrong direction, turmoil in an airport, some people or objects making unusual movements. What we’re actually doing is collecting these video data and putting it through the refinement chain, processed through a number of algorithms that recognize specific situations and detect anomalies. Adding AI capabilities to it, the system becomes self-learning and can identify, alert and predict any sort of “happening” that is out of the ordinary. This is helping decision making but at the same time it’s also an enormous cost saving because cities and security firms need only a fraction of the people. Analytics technologies are actually making these kinds of video surveillance solutions possible and affordable.RW: Right, human eyes are not very scalable.MJ: Right, human eyes are not very scalable and probably 99.99% of this CCTV video content doesn’t need attention. So you need to learn to filter the data as close as possible the source and only continue working with what is relevant.DL: So Trevor, I’ll also give you a few sets of examples. The first group would be ones for accelerating resolution faster: such as predictive maintenance, “Next Best Action,” under the realm of predictive care for recommending workflow actions to care agent, and automated root cause analysis. These example use cases were previously done manually. You wait for some faults to occur and then you look into it. With automation and prediction; instead, some machine learning solution can predict potential fault occurrence ahead of time and you can minimize expensive maintenance action for fixing the problem after the fact.Another set of examples is under the category of customer centricity with the use of artificial intelligence. Many customers are interested in this topic because at the end of the day they recognize that their competition is also trying to appease their end customers as best as they can. And whoever can do that best wins the day. So appreciating and understanding the customer experience and being able to predict that and respond to their needswould be an important aspect of big data analytics solution. For example in the context of networking solution providers and operators, knowing ahead of time that a congestion is going to happen and reacting to it, would be important. Maybe having a well-managed, butdegraded, performance is better than not having any services at all in certain circumstances. So getting ahead of the problem with customer centricity is also a form of AI application – understand their experience and then acting accordingly. The third one, I would say is the augmented reality use cases which appeals to the higher level executive and the policy owners of the operators of the IoT enterprise.Another class of problems would fit under the category of “optimization.” If you look at a set of business outcomes, you can set up the problem as an optimization problem: these are my sandboxes, here is my raw data and my KPIs and that is what I want to optimize as goals. The system can then be set up to optimize it. This is related to the point where one has the opportunity to break down organizational silos and optimize certain outcomes that are previously undiscoverable when the organizations are siloed. Such type of intelligence appeals more to the executive and policy owners of the organizations.This article as produced in partnership with Nokia. It is part of a series of articles where the team from Nokia will be providing expert advice and delve further into data analytics, security and IoT platforms. For enterprise teams, data seems to be everywhere, waiting to be unlocked to drive your business goals forward. We sat down recently with two of Nokia’s leading IoT authorities — Marc Jadoul, IoT Market development director, Denny Lee, Head of Analytics Strategy — to talk about how your firm’s data could be oil that drives it forward.ReadWrite: So this expression – “Data is the new oil” — is something I’ve heard bandied around at conferences and raised a few times. But the thing is, oil could be a fuel, and it could also be a lubricant, in your mind, with your clients, what does that mean?Marc Jadoul: The way I look at it, is from a value point of view. If you compare the price of a barrel of crude oil with the price of a barrel of jet fuel, there’s quite some difference. Data, like oil, can and must go through a similar refinement process.The more it’s refined, the more value it can provide because like fuel, it will support more sophisticated applications. Another way to think about this is like a pyramid – if you’re starting at the bottom of the pyramid, you are basically collecting raw data at the sensor level. At the next stage, you start to monitor this data and begin to discover what is included in it. You’re probably going to uncover some anomalies or trends and based on your analysis, you may uncover critical information that helps you create value for the company driving better decision making so-called Data Driven Decision Making (DDDM).Then, if you do this decision making in a kind of learning phase based upon cognitive analytics you’re not only going to help make decisions but also predict behavior. Once you can predict behavior then you have gotten to the point of the most refined data, where the data is pure enough to be transformed into knowledge in order to help your machines and applications make autonomous decisions.What I have described is a value chain where data is providing insight and knowledge to help companies make better decisions and ultimately automating some processes and decision making. I’m making the parallel with the oil industry, not as a metaphor for the lubricant function (laughs), but as compared to the refinement process. The more you refine it, the more it becomes useful and the more value you retrieve.Denny Lee: When people use the new oil phrase I always think back to the 1970’s – when you control the oil, you control the economy. I think when one says “data is the new oil” it is rooted in this similarity. Data is the new oil also means that if you are able to take hold of that control, you can command that economy and your sector better.When I hear that term, it also goes back to the idea that “data is the currency.” Data is quite raw in its form and people often use this term quite loosely. Some might think that data, insight, and intelligence are all referring to the same thing. But in fact, we actually make quite a distinction between these. Ultimately, we advocate that data is the raw ingredient and we want to process data that lead to insights. Insights and intelligence are what the business needs. I’m sure we will talk later on how to utilize this intelligence for actionable business purposes.RW: So when you sit down with a client to discuss how to get them to envision a data-driven innovation within their organization, what’s the first thing that they need to know, the first thing that they should ask?MJ: I think the first thing they need to do is to understand their own business and what are the challenges and problems that they want to solve. Instead of the contrary, trying to find a problem for their solution. Quoting Simon Sinek, one should start with the “why?” instead with the “how?” or the “what?” question.DL: Business outcome is definitely one thing but before that you have to ask the question to whom you are speaking to in the organization. Each will have a different organizational boundary or realm of responsibility which will drive a different set of questions.For example, if you are speaking to a CEO, his or her sand box is huge. On the other hand, you could be talking to a siloed part of the organization where their own universe is very defined. Then you need to understand their business context and their ultimate desired business outcome, You then work backwards and say “ok, what kind of data do you really have?”; and you try to connect the problem to a solution. Obviously when we are talking about the analytics context, it is about processing the data to the point in which it can drive their business outcome.Then eventually we should talk about crossing organization boundaries. This is a very important point that we should not miss. Sometimes the nuggets of intelligence come only by breaking down the barriers between organizations.RW: You’ve said in terms of the CEO that you’ve got a bigger sandbox to work in, but when I talk to other folks who are trying to implement a data driven solution of some kind around IoT, the idea of who the champion within an organization is often at the core of who really knows that challenges are within about organization, is there anything you can say about what a typical organizational champion would look like and how to orientate those goals across the organization?DL: Well, in the IoT context, the organization can often be divided into two realms. The Operations Technology (OT) side and the Information Technology (IT) side. On the OT side your solution could be targeted at the person that controls the infrastructure for his or her company. Depending on the person you are speaking to within that group, they will have different needs.Let’s take the customer who is focused on predictive maintenance as an example. In this case, he or she may only have budget to focus on maintenance and use big data and machine learning to support the maintenance cycle and to minimize machine outages. This is a very narrow use case with a specific objective. But if you talk to their manager, the scope and the context of the problem they are trying to solve is much broader and might cross organization boundariesMJ: I really would like to complement this view with a look to a different part of the organization. Besides the leaders that need the analytics to make good decisions, I see the importance of the role of data analyst emerging in a number of organizations. These experts know how to deal with the data – or using the metaphor we used before: control the refinement process. We’re talking here about a different set of skills than the ones traditional IT people have. My educational background is computer sciene and 20 years ago, the basis of computer science education was mathematics. When I looked to the curriculum 5-10 years later, the emphasis had shifted towards algorithms and programming languages. Today, my son is doing his PhD in AI and, believe me, these students must have a very solid understanding of mathematics and statistics again. And let’s not forget that – as data scientists need to support enterprises’ business decisions – they also must have a good level of domain knowledge and business acumen.RW: So it’s come full circle?MJ: With most complex problems where you can’t just use raw computer data and number crunching to do something with the data. You really need the domain knowledge to know what’s meaningful and what’s not meaningful. And these are the people that are making it happen in organizations as they are in a support role to the internal decision makers as Denny described. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Follow the Puck Tags:#Big Data#data security#Internet of Things#IoT#Nokia Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Related Posts Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to…last_img read more

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‘Saharanpur riots timed for local polls’

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a month ago​Faustino Anjorin set to earn Chelsea contract extension

first_img​Faustino Anjorin set to earn Chelsea contract extensionby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea are set to offer youngster Faustino Anjorin a new contract.The young midfielder is on the fringes of the first team, despite only being 17.Boss Frank Lampard sees him as an exciting prospect.Now the club are trying to tie Anjorin down to a new, long term deal in the coming months, according to Goal.He should also be involved in the squad for their Carabao Cup game with Grimsby Town on Wednesday.The 17-year-old has a contract until 2021, but the club want to give him better terms and to increase the length of his deal. TagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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15 days agoArsenal looking to extend Dani Ceballos loan

first_imgArsenal looking to extend Dani Ceballos loanby Paul Vegas15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal are looking to extend Dani Ceballos’s loan deal, according to reports.The Spaniard has featured in all eight Premier League games since joining the Gunners on a season-long loan.Ceballos hinted this week that he would be open to leaving Real Madrid for Arsenal on a permanent basis.However, Real would likely demand a huge fee for the 23-year-old, which does not suit the frugal North London outfit.Instead El Confidential says Arsenal are exploring the option of extending Ceballos’ loan by another season.That might not suit Los Blancos however as the La Liga giants are already speaking like Ceballos is not their player.Real would likely seek a fee similar to the £40.3m paid by Chelsea for Mateo Kovacic., according to reports.The Spaniard has featured in all eight Premier League games since joining the Gunners on a season-long loan.Ceballos hinted this week that he would be open to leaving Real Madrid for Arsenal on a permanent basis.However, Real would likely demand a huge fee for the 23-year-old, which does not suit the frugal North London outfit.Instead El Confidential says Arsenal are exploring the option of extending Ceballos’ loan by another season.That might not suit Los Blancos however as the La Liga giants are already speaking like Ceballos is not their player.Real would likely seek a fee similar to the £40.3m paid by Chelsea for Mateo Kovacic. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Indianorigin exTrump hotel partner arrested for theft

first_imgWashington: Dinesh Chawla, a prominent Indian-origin hotelier in the US, who previously partnered with President Donald Trump’s family on four hotels, has been arrested on charges of stealing bags from the Memphis airport for the “thrill and excitement,” according to media reports. According to police records, airport security footage recorded Chawla, the CEO of Chawla Hotels, on August 18 removing another passenger’s suitcase from a baggage claim carousel at the Memphis International Airport in the US state of Tennessee and putting it in his car before taking a flight. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsThe airport police said they searched the car and discovered the suitcase and another piece of luggage that had been taken from the airport a month earlier, The New York Times reported. Chawla, 56, was arrested when he returned to Memphis on Thursday and admitted to stealing the two bags and their contents, valued at about $4,000, according to a police affidavit. The records also said Chawla had confessed to stealing other luggage “over a long period of time,” but it provided no details of other thefts. Chawla told an officer “that he knows stealing luggage is wrong, but he does it for the thrill and excitement,” the NYT quoted the records as saying. He was given a $5,000 bond and released on Thursday. Chawla has a court date scheduled for Friday, Mississippi Clarion-Ledger newspaper reported. He could not immediately be reached for comment, the report said.last_img read more

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Billie slams magazine for using her photo without consent

first_imgLos Angeles: Singer Billie Eilish has blasted a German magazine over its cover art that featured a bald and shirtless photo of the singer. The 17-year-old singer posted a lengthy comment on Nylon Germany’s official Instagram page after the magazine shared the cover art, designed by Marcel C Wilkens, which depicted her as a “supernatural fembot of the future”. “1. I was never approached by Nylon about this piece whatsoever. I did not know it was happening nor did anyone on my team. 2. This is not even a real picture of me. I had absolutely no creative input. 3. You’re gonna make a picture of me shirtless?? That’s not real?? at 17? and make it the cover???? Even if the picture was supposed to look like some robot version of me… I did not consent in any way. 4. And you’re gonna remove all my f***in hair? Boo to you,” Eilish wrote. After the uproar from the singer and her fans, the magazine removed the cover art and clarified that their intention was not to hurt anyone.last_img read more

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How to hide a celebrity at the Toronto International Film Festival

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Red carpets, after-parties and onstage screening appearances are when the famous are working at the festival. Otherwise, they’re off the clock and, at least for some, trying to stay out of sight.1. The ‘other’ Pearson airport The game of hide-and-seek begins as soon as they land in Toronto. Big stars tend to arrive via private plane.You may have noticed the huge Skyservice Business Aviation building across from the main terminals as your plane taxis at Pearson International Airport. The other half ends up here if they’re coming or going by charter jet.The 31-year-old Canadian company has what’s known as a fixed base operation, or FBO, at Pearson. It includes a sizable “luxury” private lounge with a wall of windows overlooking the runways.This private mini-terminal is open 24/7 for guests to shower, nap, or have a pre-arranged meal, from a fast-food burger to a gourmet feast. A 24-hour concierge is available to look after requests.“TIFF is our Christmas,” says Catherine Vettese, Skyservice manager of marketing and communications. “It is absolutely by far our busiest time of the year in Toronto. At any time of day you will see row after row of private jets parked.” Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Advertisement They’re the centre of attention at the Toronto International Film Festival — unless they don’t want to be.So just how do you hide a movie star?It’s a challenge, a bit like smuggling an elephant into a room underneath a washcloth. But there are ways. A limo to the stairs of a private jet, a brisk hustle through a hotel kitchen or ducking in through an inconspicuous entrance can be a celebrity’s best friend. Facebook Login/Register With:last_img read more

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