Tag: 夜上海

Independent media under pressure as presidential election nears

first_img News Follow the news on Azerbaijan Receive email alerts Organisation “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia June 8, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Reporters Without Borders today deplored growing harassment of Azerbaijan’s independent press with the approach of a presidential election in October. Several opposition journalists and media organisation officials were arrested on 26 July. “We are shocked at the increasing legal, media and physical pressure on opposition journalists,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard in a letter to interior minister Ramil Usubov. “These illegal arrests are clearly political and simply aimed at preventing journalists revealing things that displease President Heidar Aliev. The only law they have broken is the law of silence.”He warned that the authorities would be held responsible if anything happened to one of those arrested, Rauf Arifoglu, editor of the daily paper Yeni Musavat, who has been told his life might be in danger.The governing board of the national media association and Arifoglu said they had heard of plans to arrest him and the heads of the main opposition press and media organisations had gone to his home in Baku on 26 July to discuss the situation. As they were leaving to go the Press Club, 10 police cars appeared and roughly seized Arifoglu, Press Council president Aflatun Amashev, Press Council member Gunduz Takhirli, Mekhman Aliyev, head of the Turan news agency, Arif Aliyev, head of the Yeni Nesil trade union, Ganimat Zakhidov, managing editor of the daily paper Azadliq, and Yeni Musavat staffers Aflatun Amashev, Elkhan Hasanli, Safar Hummatov, Mirza Zeynalov and Murshud Hasanov. All were freed an hour and a half later. Police said they had violated traffic laws and had insulted and hit the police. Justice minister Fikret Mamadov accused the media the same day of trying to destabilise the country before the 15 October presidential elections and said he would crack down on media that failed to respect the ban on undermining the “honour and dignity” of the president. These warnings were repeated a few hours later by prosecutor-general Zakir Garalov. The day before, interior minister Usubov had accused opposition media of putting out defamatory and insulting material.Yeni Musavat and other pro-opposition papers have recently written about the declining health of 80-year-old President Aliev, who has been in hospital in Turkey since 8 July. Help by sharing this information to go furthercenter_img News RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan June 4, 2021 Find out more July 28, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Independent media under pressure as presidential election nears News AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia News Russian peacekeepers deny foreign reporters access to Nagorno-Karabakh April 9, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Kazakhstan censors coverage of Eurasian Economic Union summit

first_img January 15, 2021 Find out more News Reporters prevented from covering Kazakh parliamentary elections Help by sharing this information KazakhstanEurope – Central Asia News RSF_en Kazakh reporter accuses police of attacking her Follow the news on Kazakhstan Receive email alerts Newscenter_img Organisation News Regional newspaper editor harassed after investigating real estate scandal May 30, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Kazakhstan censors coverage of Eurasian Economic Union summit The Kazakh authorities did everything possible to prevent journalists spoiling the party when President Nursultan Nazarbayev received his Russian and Belarusian counterparts, Vladimir Putin and Aleksander Lukashenko, in Astana on 29 May for the signing of the treaty creating the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU).Three journalists were arrested and a leading news website was partially blocked in order to silence critics.The journalists – Sanat Urnalyev and Viktor Gudz, who work for the 16/12 website, and Orken Bisenov (also known as Orken Joyamergen), who works for Radio Azattyk (Radio Free Europe’s Kazakh service) ¬ were arrested near Astana on 27 May while covering a meeting of activists who were preparing an anti-EEU meeting in Astana scheduled for 29 May.Around 20 of the meeting’s participants were also arrested. An Astana administrative court sentenced the journalists to four days of solitary confinement on a “minor acts of vandalism” charge at around 6 a.m. on 28 May, after a trial lasting several hours.Radio Azattyk’s website was partially blocked inside Kazakhstan for several hours on 29 May, as the three presidents were meeting to sign the treaty. All of Radio Azattyk’s articles on the EEU were inaccessible during this period.“We condemn these acts of censorship, which are unacceptable,” said Johann Bihr, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk. “The journalists were given four-day sentences to prevent them from covering the 29 May demonstration. Their sentences also sent an intimidatory message to all other journalists.”Bihr added: “The authorities want to gag the media to prevent them from relaying the discontent of those who are opposed to the Eurasian Economic Union. Ever since the December 2011 riots in Zhanaozen, which were crushed bloodily, the authorities have feared that their grip on power could be shaken by further unrest.”Freedom of information has been declining for years in Kazakhstan as the authorities arrest and convict more and more news providers and adopt legislative reforms that give them ever-tighter control of the media.Kazakhstan is ranked 161st out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.(Photo : Michael Klimentyev / Ria Novosti Pool/ AFP) February 5, 2021 Find out more to go further KazakhstanEurope – Central Asia October 30, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Dissident doctor and reporter paroled after nearly a year in pre-trial detention

first_img CubaAmericas New press freedom predators elected to UN Human Rights Council Darsi Ferrer, a dissident public health activist who contributes to independent news media, was finally tried yesterday on charges of “irregularities” and “assault” and was granted a conditional release after being held without trial since July 2009.A physician who heads the independent “Juan Bruno Zayas Health and Human Rights Centre,” Ferrer upset the authorities by gathering and disseminating information about the current state of the Cuban health system and the situation of political prisoners.Ferrer had been held in Valle Grande prison, west of Havana, since his arrest on 21 July 2009, for which the official reason was his “illegal” acquisition of building materials to repair his house . Prosecutors requested a three-year jail sentence, but the court sentenced him yesterday to 15 months and said he could serve the remaining four months under house arrest.“We are obviously relieved by Ferrer’s release even if he was finally given a jail sentence to match the time he already had spent behind bars,” Reporters Without Borders said. “No one is fooled about the real reason for his detention as this is a country in which the authorities tolerate no public expression of dissenting views. His release was not in any way an act of clemency or, even less so, a sign of an improvement in respect for basis rights and freedoms.”Cuba still has approximately 200 prisoners of conscience, who include 24 journalists. One of them is the Reporters Without Borders correspondent Ricardo González Alfonso, who has been held since the “Black Spring” crackdown of March 2003.Dissidents continue to be the target of harassment, repression and hate campaigns by the authorities and their supporters. Hablemos Press, a small independent news agency, reported that two more journalists, José Manuel Caraballo Bravo and Raúl Arias Márquez of the Agencia de Prensa Libre Avileña (APLA), were arrested on 21 June.Reporters Without Borders reiterates its appeal to the community of Latin American countries to intercede on behalf of Cuba’s imprisoned journalists and dissidents, some of whom have fallen seriously ill since their arrest CubaAmericas October 15, 2020 Find out more June 23, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Dissident doctor and reporter paroled after nearly a year in pre-trial detention Help by sharing this information RSF_en RSF and Fundamedios welcome US asylum ruling in favor of Cuban journalist Serafin Moran Santiago Receive email alerts to go furthercenter_img Follow the news on Cuba Cuba and its Decree Law 370: annihilating freedom of expression on the Internet News May 6, 2020 Find out more October 12, 2018 Find out more News News News Organisation last_img read more

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Tickets Now Available for Our New Girl Off-Broadway

first_imgTickets are now on sale for the U.S. premiere of Nancy Harris’ Our New Girl. The Atlantic Theater Company production will begin performances on May 28. Under the direction of Gaye Taylor Upchurch, the play will star Mary McCann, Lisa Joyce, CJ Wilson and Henry Kelemen. Our New Girl will run through June 29 at Atlantic Stage 2. Opening night is set for June 10. Show Closed This production ended its run on June 29, 2014 View Comments Behind the shiny door of Hazel Robinson’s (McCann) perfect London home, nothing is as it seems. Hazel’s plastic surgeon husband Richard (Wilson) has embarked on his latest charitable quest in Haiti, leaving the heavily pregnant Hazel with a failing business and a problem son. When a professional nanny arrives unannounced on the Robinsons’ doorstep, Hazel finds her home under the shadow of a perfect stranger with an agenda of her own. Related Shows Our New Girllast_img read more

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Has coal helped Appalachia?

first_imgIllustration by Wade MickleyCoal provided jobs and income for several generations when little else would. While it would be great to phase out its use, the money it still provides to thousands of families will be hard to replace anytime soon.—Mark Wenger, Williamsburg, Va.——————-I would love to answer this question with an unequivocal “no,” but to do so would be to deny the incredible importance that coal has played in the lives of my fellow citizens of southwest Virginia. It would ignore the reality that coal from these hills fired the forges that helped create the steel girders that frame the highrises housing so many coal naysayers enjoy today. And, most importantly, it would dishonor the memory of my grandfather, who was an engineer and superintendent for a coal company here in Wise County and provided for my father’s family. I wholeheartedly understand, and mourn, the drastic effects of coal mining on our mountains, and I look to the future when coal isn’t a necessary ingredient in energy production, with great anticipation. However, knowing the role that coal has played in Appalachia’s history, the only honest answer for me is yes. —Ernie Slemp, Wise, Va.Do mountains grow back? If not, then coal has not helped. Over 470 named mountaintops have been leveled for coal mining, and many more miles of streams have been filled or polluted from associated blast material.—Daryl Johnson, Charleston, S.C.——————-Many of the old coal towns have closed or are impoverished, with the residents in poor health. Coal was a brief boon to people years ago, but the long-term negative effects that they still experience today far outweigh any short-term benefits. We need to move away from the fossil-fuel age and toward a more productive and less environmentally harmful energy source. Unfortunately because of constantly increasing population growth, the solutions are really just compromises, so we must look at what hurts people and the environment the least. Maybe nuclear energy sources are a better way than coal, as they have pretty good track record over a half-century of use. But coal certainly isn’t the answer.—Gregory Rowley, Richmond, Va.——————-Any resource extraction industry that pollutes in every stage of its lifecycle is not good for Appalachia. Coal pollutes rivers and groundwater when it is blasted and scraped out of the ground; it pollutes when it is transported hundreds of miles by diesel truck and train; and it pumps mercury, sulfates, and lead into our air when it is burned. While it has given short-term, black-lung-type jobs and has provided energy for our power-hungry economy (that’s you and me), it has done far more harm than good. Until people change their consumptive habits, coal will continue to “help” Appalachia. One of the easiest ways to reduce your consumption is to install energy conserving technologies in your home. If every homeowner took the simple step of increasing air sealing on their ducts and in the thermal envelope of their home with mastic and caulk, valuable conditioned air would not seep out of the home and we would ultimately use less coal—just one of the hundreds of things homeowners could do to help reduce our dependence on local coal. —Lela Stephens, Asheville, N.C.The short of it is that money trumps the environment–and the poor valley folks that are getting dumped on.Big money goes to mine owners, the coal industry, and the state in the form of taxes and severance fees.The long of it is that, a century from now, people will look at the horrible scars on the mountains and wonder how others could have been so short-sighted in allowing that to happen.—John Lefebure, Ringgold, Md.——————-On any objective analysis, the answer must be yes. Critics muddy the issue. In their dislike of coal mining, they ironically blame one of the few valuable resources in the region for the stunted economic growth resulting from the very dearth of resources there. It’s as if someone were to blame doctors for the sick people we find in hospitals.A West Virginia University Center for Business and Economic Research study assessed the economic impacts on the state’s economy from the so-called Haden decision that would have made mountain top mining uneconomic for the state. The decision was subsequently overturned on appeal, but the economic impact it would have had—15,000 jobs lost, and a $2.4 billion hit to aggregate state economic output—suggests the contributions that the coal industry makes to the region.Note too the study’s scathing assessments of the view that tourism could somehow replace coal as a viable economic activity: “absurd” is the reaction from economists who’ve looked closely at this issue. What the original study and an update both underscore is not only coal’s net contributions to West Virginia’s economic welfare, but the impacts to “non-coal” counties if coal mining were to stop. It’s particularly foolish and possibly heartless for coal’s critics to so cavalierly dismiss this severe economic impact that would fall hardest on coal counties.—Luke Popovich, Vice President, National Mining Associationlast_img read more

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Striker May tipped to end Sheffield Wednesday drought

first_imgSheffield Wednesday manager Stuart Gray backed striker Stevie May to end his goalscoring drought after the striker missed chances against Brentford.The 21-year-old, who has not found the net in six games, hit the post in the first half of a goalless draw at Griffin Park and boss Gray insisted he was pleased to come away with a point.“I’m sure Stevie will get a run of goals soon. He’s hit the post tonight and how it’s ended up goalless I don’t know,” Gray said.“We’ve dominated periods in both halves and their keeper’s made a number of fine saves. But collectively it was a great team effort.“I’ve got to give the forwards credit for the way they defended from the front and attacked. I’m sure they’ll start scoring soon but I need goals from all around the team too.“We’ve also got to start scoring from set-pieces with our defenders, which we’re not doing. We had a lot of chances from those today.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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If Diet and Drug Science Is Uncertain, How About Evolution?

first_imgDarwinists Proclaim Molecules-to-Man Evolution is a Proven Fact—But scientists are not sure about the best diet and the efficacy of new drugs!by Dr Jerry BergmanEvolutionists are so confident that molecules-to-man evolution is true that court decisions have contentedly ruled that, because this view is consensus science and unequivocally true, it must be taught as fact. As a result, academic institutions think that both teachers and professors can be justly terminated if they do not teach it as fact.Civil rights attorney G. Merle Bergman (no relation) wrote about one case like that: in fact, my case. I was a professor who lost my position at Bowling Green State University (BGSU), not because I was teaching creation, but because I had written a monograph for the honor society in education, Phi Delta Kappa! It was a Fastback piece titled, ‘Teaching About the Creation/Evolution Controversy.’[1] For suggesting that Darwinism not be taught dogmatically, I was subjected to endless ridicule and questions about my sanity. Attorney G. Merle Bergman wrote,I am aghast at the suggestion that his … [termination] was because of his religious views, as expressed in his writings on the subject. Obviously nothing could be further from American tradition and constitutional principles than that a man be denied opportunity on the basis of his religious thought. On the other hand, I have to ask myself how practical it is for a creationist to impress scientifically minded men and women with his objectivity—which is certainly a prime virtue for any teacher. I could not myself consider that a teacher had much of a grasp on reality if he or she believed that the creationist view of the universe was a realistic one.cartoon by Brett MillerG. Merle Bergman continued his insinuation that I must be insane to doubt Darwin because, to him, evolution is so obviously true:from the point of view of science, evolution is proven many times over, whereas creationism is viewed as a leftover from very primitive folklore.  Taking that to be the view of men and women of science, can we really say that it is because of Jerry Bergman’s religion that they would be adverse to giving him a vote of confidence as a teacher?  I think their negative vote was a reflection of their view that he was too far removed from reality to be able to direct young people along objective paths. …They are not judging the man’s right to hold and to express religious views different from their own, but his ability to define reality.[2]Such is the certainty of Darwinians that unguided natural processes created everything, that they claim it is their critics who are out of touch with reality!Academic Freedom DeniedSome spoke in my defense. Author and attorney Michael Tyner, in discussing the reasons for my termination, wrote that the “most often mentioned [reason] is a Fastback written for the Phi Delta Kappa educational organization titled ‘Teaching About the Creation/Evolution Controversy.’” [3] As is clear from court documents, my peers openly terminated me on the basis of this and similar publications. BGSU Professor Gerald Rigby wrote that he was very concerned about this case because it suggests therelevancy of a religious-orthodoxy test for tenure at this University.  Insofar as Dr. Bergman’s views on religious matters, be they correct or incorrect, conventional or non-conventional, ….  were taken account of by those casting tenure votes.  …  the record speaks quite clearly to this point—such views were considered in the decision process. …  [T]he Fastback, “Teaching About the Creation/Evolution Controversy,” which Dr. Bergman authored for Phi Delta Kappa, entered into the decision ….  I have read this presentation … [and] find myself supporting the “conventional wisdom” about evolution, [but] this little booklet is a superbly done consideration of the issues involved. I can find no fault with Dr. Bergman’s analysis and presentation; it is excellently written (as are all his publications I have been privileged to read), soundly reasoned, and eminently fair in its approach. No one could legitimately cite this as support for… adverse judgment on Dr. Bergman’s scholarship … the University is a forum for exploration and exchange of ideas. Even the most unacceptable ought to have a fair hearing in a University, and the advocates of all views ought to …. receive the opportunity to explore, expound, and advocate their ideas.[4]Dr. Wallace DePue, then a Full Professor at BGSU, wrote that he wasshocked to learn that Dr. Jerry Bergman had been dismissed ….  because of his religious beliefs, namely his espousal of creationism. It is clear to me from reviewing information and talking to individuals about the case that Dr. Bergman, in violation of the University Charter, articles 1, and .4C, was dismissed solely because of his religious beliefs …. The University Charter clearly guarantees academic freedom, so termination on the grounds of espousing creationism in one’s publications is surely a violation of this article.[5]And yet the ridicule persisted. Another example is Professor Martin Bridgestock who wrote “Creationists are not like other people”[6] and Gary Finniss added such people should “crawl back into their caves and leave the explanation of life to true scientists.”[7] Such is the almost universal opprobrium by the media and academics against those who believe the theories of secular scientists may be wrong. Evolutionists are so certain of their view, they lump Darwin doubters in with Flat-Earthers and other uninformed ignoramuses.[8]Three volumes by Dr Bergman document hundreds of cases of censorship, denial of academic freedom and careers ruined because of Darwinist intolerance of criticism.How Certain Is Modern Medicine?To contrast the bluffing certitude of scientists about evolution, let’s compare it with other, more tangible, observable fields in science.Most everyone will agree that recent medical drug advancements, especially in the last 50 years, have greatly improved our lives and our lifespan length. All new drugs undergo extensive peer-reviewed testing and require approval by the Food and Drug Administration, to go through a rigorous process of clinical trials to determine whether they are significantly more effective than existing treatments. Furthermore, the efficacy of new drugs is proclaimed by clinical experience and by many millions of dollars used to advertise the benefits of new drugs. This is empirical science that no one can rationally deny. Or can they?A new study published in the world’s premier medical journal, The British Medical Journal, did just that. Although the study was done in Germany, it covers drugs commonly available in most developed nations. The study, directed by Professor Beate Wieseler, head of the department of drug assessment, concluded that “More than half of new drugs entering the German healthcare system have not been shown to add benefit.”[9] They add thatresearch covering drug approvals since the 1970s suggests only a limited number of new drugs provide real advances over existing drugs. Most studies put the proportion of true innovation at under 15%, with no clear improvement over time.[10]The shocking conclusion was not a minor study based on a small number of tests. The researchersassessed 216 drugs entering the German market following regulatory approval—152 new molecular entities and 64 drugs granted a new indication. Almost all of these drugs were approved by the European Medicines Agency for use throughout Europe. Thus our results also reflect the outcome of European drug development processes and policies.[11]Credit: Illustra MediaThe Wieseler, et al., study of 216 drugs concluded the percent that added no benefit, or had only very minor benefits, to existing treatment was 74 percent; those that added considerable benefits was 25 percent. Only a single new drug out of the 216 was judged as producing a major added benefit! Benefit refers to an improvement over standard care in areas including mortality, morbidity, or health-related quality of life in the approved patient population compared to existing treatment. The problem was particularly egregious for some medical conditions. For example, in psychiatry and neurology, the added benefit was in just 1 out of the 18 drugs researched and in diabetes, only 4 of the 24 drugs examined. In cancer, less than 20 percent showed evidence of major added benefits, and then only in some rare cancers, after over a half century of research! The researchers added that for 125 drugs they lacked data to make any judgments:For 64 of these drugs, no studies were available comparing the new drug with standard care. For another 42 drugs, although studies have compared the drug to an active comparator, the comparator was inappropriate—for example, because of off-label drug use or inappropriate dosing regimens. The remaining 19 drugs were tested against an appropriate comparison (standard care) but did not show an advantage (or clear disadvantage) of the new drug.[12]The assessment was not a very encouraging report for our billion-dollar drug industry. And yet this was for testable, observational science in the here and now, not stories about what happened millions of years ago.How Certain Is Dietary Science?Surely, dietary science is more certain. What food proportions we should consume is based on evidence from the close to one million peer-reviewed papers published in the nutrition science field. Actually, according to the cover story in New Scientist (which I received the same day I learned about the study in the British Medical Journal ) was “Why Everything You Know About Nutrition is Wrong.” Clare Wilson shocked readers with the blunt statement, “almost all nutritional science is fatally flawed.”[13]Having taught nutrition for years, I am very aware of the medical establishment’s guidelines. One example I drummed into students was 55 percent of calories should come from carbohydrates and no more than 20 percent from fat.Dietary advice keeps changing.The result of this nutritional mantra was, as a nation, Americans and the rest of the Western world went on a low-fat diet, and hundreds of low-fat foods soon flooded the market. The fat was often replaced by sugar, such as the case of popular low-fat Snackwell’s Devil’s Food Cookies. The result was not a healthier nation but an epidemic of obesity, diabetics, and heart disease, plus cancer which we now realize was largely due to diet, thanks to the very wrong advice of the experts. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention statistics of overweight adults over age 20, including obesity, was 71.6 percent which affected about 93.3 million American adults in 2015-2016. The morbid obesity prevalence was a whopping 39.8 percent of the adult population.Overweight-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, and some types of cancer. All of these diseases are leading causes of preventable, premature death in America. The estimated annual medical cost of obesity alone in the United States was $147 billion in 2008 U.S. dollars, and the medical cost of obesity was 1,429 dollars higher than the costs of those of normal weight.[14]New research is recommending closer to below 20 percent of our calories should come from carbohydrates and 55 percent from other sources, including fat. Sugar is now looked on by many as a poison which is processed in the liver as are most other poisons. Unfortunately for consumers, sugar is contained in so many foods—including ketchup, most canned goods, and even canned soups and vegetables—that it is difficult to avoid. Many soda-pop varieties contain salt to encourage you to drink more pop, to which sugar is added to take away the strong unpleasant salty taste. Especially problematic is the worst offender, the ubiquitous high-fructose corn syrup found in many, if not most, foods today.Saturated fat is poison, too; right? We’ve all been told that for a long time. But even the advice that saturated fat is harmful is problematic, a guideline that has been well-established for half a century and religiously followed by most Americans. Wilson says that advice is fatally flawed, too.[15]Yet Scientists “Know” that All Life Evolved from Simple MoleculesAlthough almost a million peer-reviewed studies have not been able to determine the best diet during the last half-century, Darwinian scientists confidently claim that all life on earth descended from some hypothetical cell that somehow spontaneously arose 3.5 billion years ago in some ancient sea. Since Pasteur, though, clear empirical evidence has documented the only source of life is life. Furthermore, the orthodox source of new genetic variety, mutations (damage to the genome) fails as a source of new variation. The fact is, from empirical laboratory research (which is what I did when doing cancer research because cancer is a cell disease caused by mutations) we know that mutations cause disease, not upward evolutionary improvement.[16]The vast majority (99.9 percent) of all mutations are detrimental or near neutral, meaning they cause minor genetic damage which eventually adds up. Mutations add up to genetic catastrophe, i. e., disease or death, not progress.[17]  We know that the near-neutral mutational load is increasing in each generation. It’s a one-way slope downwards, leading to genetic catastrophe for a species, i. e., extinction. Despite the improvement of health-care technology, such as MRI and ultrasound, many studies document that chronic disease is increasing worldwide, especially mutation-associated disease.[18]One positive effect of mutations was found in a study that analyzed the DNA from 215,000 healthy people to probe genetic changes over one or two generations.[19] The study found damaging mutations tend to be weeded out because the mutation causes the carrier to be born stillborn, die young or before he or she can reproduce. The result is that specific mutations are eliminated from the population. Some mutations are not passed on for this reason, but new ones still occur. Some diseases, such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, still occurs in the male population. This is partly because the gene affected, the DMD gene, which encodes the muscle protein dystrophin, is one of the largest genes in the human body. The larger a gene, the more likely it will be hit with a mutation; concurrently, small genes are much less likely to be hit.These are the observable facts about mutations. And yet Darwinians are so confident in their belief that mutations took bacteria all the way to man, they consider anyone who doubts it out of touch with reality!ConclusionsIt is disingenuous to pretend that science is able to determine if, when, and how all life on earth evolved from some primordial goo when scientists cannot even figure out what we should eat or take for medicine. It is unconscionable to act so certain that this happened, that it could justify firing those who disagree. And yet this has happened many times; I am not the only person in scientific academia who learned that denying the consensus on evolution can be a career-ending move. Dare to share some of the lethal problems of the Darwinian worldview, and you, too, could be described as “too far removed from reality to be able to direct young people along objective paths,” and thus face termination.[20]ReferencesBergman’s book about Darwin is an eye-opener.[1]  M. A. Tyner. 1985. The Professor Who Lost His Job.  Liberty, 80 (1): 5.[2] Bergman, G. Merle. 1985. Letters. “The Professor Who Lost His Job.”  Liberty, 80(3):28, May-June.[3]  M. A. Tyner, 1985, p. 5.[4]  Affidavit of Dr. Gerald Rigby dated October 24, 1983.[5]  Affidavit of Dr. Wallace DePue dated September 16, 1983.[6] Bridgestock, Martin. 1985. “Creation Science:  You’ve Got to Believe It to See It!” Ideas in Education, July, p. 17.[7] Finniss, Gary M. 1985.  “We’re All Related to Apes.” USA Today, Aug. 17, p. 7.[8] Robert J. Schadewald. 1981. Equal Time for Flat-Earth Science. Creation/Evolution Journal. Issue 3, Winter 1981. https://ncse.com/cej/2/1/equal-time-flat-earth-science[9] Wieseler, et al. 2019. New drugs: Where did we go wrong? BMJ 2019; 366 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l4340 (Published 10 July 2019).[10] Wieseler, et al. 2019.[11] Wieseler, et al. 2019.[12] Wieseler, et al. 2019.[13] Wilson, Clare. 2019. The Only Food Advice You Need. July 13-19, New Scientist, p. 32.[14]  https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html.[15]  Wilson, 2019, pp. 34-35.[16] Mostafavi, H., et al. 2017. Identifying genetic variants that affect viability in large cohorts. PLOS Biology. 15 (9): e2002458.[17] Sanford, John. 2008. Genetic Entropy and the Mystery of the Genome, 3rd ed. Waterloo, NY: FMS Publications.[18] Chronic Disease Overview. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. cdc.gov, accessed July 16, 2019.[19] Martin, B. 2017. Massive genetic study shows how humans are evolving. Nature; Mostafavi, H., et al., 2017. PLoS Biol. 15, e2002458.[20]  Bergman, 1985, p. 28.Dr. Jerry Bergman has taught biology, genetics, chemistry, biochemistry, anthropology, geology, and microbiology at several colleges and universities including for over 40 years at Bowling Green State University, Medical College of Ohio where he was a research associate in experimental pathology, and The University of Toledo. He is a graduate of the Medical College of Ohio, Wayne State University in Detroit, the University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University. He has over 1,300 publications in 12 languages and 40 books and monographs. His books and textbooks that include chapters that he authored, are in over 1,500 college libraries in 27 countries. So far over 80,000 copies of the 40 books and monographs that he has authored or co-authored are in print. For more articles by Dr Bergman, see his Author Profile.(Visited 420 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Football Friday at Primedia

first_imgFootball Fridays took over the Johannesburg office of Primedia on Friday 11 September, with the staff of Talk Radio 702, Cape Talk and 94.7 Highveld Stereo showing their true South Africa 2010 colours!Paul Bannister, acting CEO of the International Marketing Council of South Africa, with Talk Radio 702’s John Robbie. (Photo: Brand South Africa)If the cap fits, wear it! (Or if you can’t play it, display it!) (Photo: Brand South Africa) View the full photoset on FlickrShare your own Football Friday thoughts, photos and videos Posted on SouthAfrica.info on 14 September 2009.last_img read more

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Late goal sees Bafana top Afcon group

first_imgThe goal meant Bafana Bafana were now top of the group again, with Angola up to second and set to also reach the quarterfinals. Morocco were down to third and Cape Verde remained fourth. Khune then went down, suffering from cramp, drawing out the tension as the Bafana Bafana fans waited anxiously for the final whistle. Confirmation was received that Cape Verde had won. They were guaranteed a quarterfinals place in their first Afcon finals tournament. Wonderful saveA minute before the break, however, Chafni was put through on goal, forcing Khune to come a good 15 metres out of his box to challenge. Chafni tried to nutmeg the South African net-minder, but Khune dropped onto his knees and onto the ball and then cleared for the sideline. A decent attack opened up a shot for Bernard Parker, but it was was deflected and slowed down, allowing the goalkeeper to gather the ball before it crossed the line. Morocco led at the break. They had dominated the early going, but Bafana Bafana looked better as the half progressed. A tension-filled second half was on the cards and so it played out. Before play restarted, South African captain Bongani Khumalo pulled his men together in a circle on the pitch, urging them to find a reply to the Moroccans’ goal. Good cornerPhala delivered a good corner from the left, but Sangweni, at the far post, was unable to make good contact with the ball and a goal kick resulted. Decent shotParker then got away South Africa’s first decent effort from the left, but his aim was slightly off and the ball passed harmlessly across the face of goal. Rain was falling and plenty of niggling tackles made for a stop, start affair as the referee had to blow for a free kick time after time. Slowly, though, the match found its rhythm On the back footThe North Africans managed the first shot on goal in the third minute from a corner and a minute later Itumeleng Khune had to react quickly to prevent Youssef El-Arabi from getting onto the end of a ball into the South African area. Khune parried the shot on the edge of the box and then took the ball comfortably when it spun back into the area. At the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Cape Verde took the lead from Angola. They were up to second. What it meant was a goal by Morocco would knock South Africa out of the tournament. South African fans celebrated while Morocco’s players sat disconsolately on the pitch, their dream over. They had brought a lot to the game, but had come away with nothing in the end. Tokelo Rantie turned Mehdi Benatia easily in the eighth minute and powered his way into the area. The defender tugged on his shirt, but didn’t make enough of an impact to award for a penalty to be awarded against Morocco as Rantie went down in the box. The home side fought back and Kamel Chafni brought May Mahlangu down as the Sweden-based midfielder made a run deep into the North Africans’ territory. From their first set piece opportunity, South Africa made a right mess of it and Morocco counter-attacked. Phala then went down in the Moroccan box two minutes later, but there was minimal contact by the defender and he was lucky not to be shown a yellow card after a very delayed reaction to the challenge. The Moroccan goalkeeper then required treatment on an elbow, which underlined Morocco’s tactic of slowing the contest down as 25 minutes to play showed on the clock. Already there had been a few other time wasting incidents and South African skipper Bongani Khumalo drew the ref’s attention to it. On the sideline, Bafana coach Gordon Igesund exhorted his men to get forward and take the game to the Lions of the Atlas. Khune testedChahir Belghazouani almost made it 2-0 to Morocco when Khune spilt his shot, but the ball passed around the outside of Bafana’s left-hand post. El Adoua managed a powerful header, but was wide of the mark. Ominously for the home supporters, South Africa were clearly struggling at set piece time. Barada took on Khune from range early on. His low, skimming shot was on target, but Khune saved comfortably to his left. Abdelilah Hafidi, who had come on only minutes earlier was shown a yellow card after fouling Serero and then kicking the ball way. South Africa’s push for an equaliser continued, much in the same form as they had pressed before the half-time whistle. With 15 minutes remaining, Morocco were forced to adjust their style of play, needing to score another goal to advance. South Africa, though, defended resolutely and the clock ticked down to 10 minutes to play. Thuso Phala ran hard at the Moroccan defenders throughout the match, while Bernard Parker got through a ton of work. In the end, though, it was an all-round team performance that saw South Africa through to the next stage of the tournament. Four minutes of stoppage time were added on as the contest hit its 90th minute. Out in the middle of the pitch, Mahlangu lay in pain on the ground. He looked to have pulled a muscle. Kagisho Dikgacoi ran on in his place. Despite being down by a goal after the first half-hour, South Africa were still on course for the quarterfinals as the second place finishers in the group, with the game between Cape Verde and Angola level at nil-nil in Port Elizabeth. Angola goalThe tension in the game was clear to see when Anele Ngongcga was yellow carded for a bad tackle and players from both teams converged on the referee. At about the same time, news of a goal to Angola came through. Still, the advantage belonged to the tournament hosts, who owned the tie-breaker, having defeated the Angolans. A speedy counter-attack from Rantie after Bafana had defended a corner almost opened up the Moroccan defence, but they ultimately conceded a corner, which Bafana failed to make good use of. MidfieldIn the midfield, Dean Furman toiled manfully, while May Mahlangu showed some classy touches, which included a stunning goal. With half-time approaching, Bafana Bafana began to push Morocco back and managed to work their way deep into the North Africans’ territory without finding a testing finish for goalkeeper Nadir Lamyaghri as the Moroccan central defence stood strong, led by Benatia. South Africa, though, looked more composed on the ball than they had earlier been. SubstitutionFive minutes into the half, coach Gordon Igesund opted to replace Katlego Mphela, who had been very quiet, with Thulani Serero, taking off a target man for a more skilful player. For a while, though, it appeared their dream of Afcon success would end at the final group stage hurdle.center_img LevelWith only four minutes of regulation time remaining, the crowd came back to life as central defender Sangweni netted for a second match in succession. Showing the composure of a good striker, he controlled the ball and then curled a lovely, low shot wide into the goalkeeper’s bottom left hand corner. The South African players rushed to embrace him. Now South Africa topped the group. At the back, goalkeeper Itumeleng Khune did as much as anyone to keep the hosts in the tournament with a string of excellent saves, while central defender Siyabonga Sangweni turned goal scorer again. Chafni then beat Dean Furman in the South African box, but Parker darted in to nip the ball away from his feet. A free kick in the 52nd minute, from just outside the Moroccan box was taken by Phala, forcing a diving one-handed save from the goalkeeper as the ball headed for Lamyaghri’s top right hand corner. The Lions of the Atlas looked assured on the ball, having more time to find their own men than they were affording Bafana Bafana when the men in yellow had it. The Lions of the Atlas had certainly settled sooner than South Africa and were taking the game to the tournament hosts. Bafana responded with a shot from Serero, but Lamyaghri got his body behind the ball and dropped down to field it. A short while later Chafni brought Serero down on the edge of the Moroccan box with a tackle that could have earned him a second yellow card. The referee, however, did not reach for his pocket. Phala’s free kick flew disappointingly high over goal. Morocco aheadNews then came through that Cape Verde had leveled in Port Elizabeth. Moments later, South Africa conceded a goal. El Arabi created space on the left and when the ball was cut back deep, Hafidi chested it down and beat Khune to his left to make it Morocco 2, South Africa 1. The crowd went quiet. Phala managed a teasing cross along the ground, but Moroccan goalkeeper Lamyaghri met it at the left hand post as no one from South Africa made a run. 27 January 2013 GoalShortly after that, in the 10th minute, the men in red went a goal up from a corner. Khune missed with an attempt at a punch and central defender Issam El Adoua rose high above Siyabonga Sangweni to header home from very close range. With just over an hour played, the group standings remained unchanged. If the scores in the two games remained the same, Morocco would top the group with South Africa in second, Angola in third and Cape Verde in fourth. Parker picked up a yellow card in the 74th minute, just before Phala floated in another free kick, which forced a diving punch out of the goalkeeper. A short while later, Parker made way for his Kaizer Chiefs’ team-mate Reneilwe Letsholonyane. South African goalIn the 71st minute, his team responded. Picking up the ball on the left, just outside the Moroccan box after playing a one-two with Rantie, May Mahlangu curled a beautifully judged shot beyond Lamyaghri into the goalie’s top left hand corner. Mahlangu had little time to react before he was swamped by a sea of yellow and green clad players. The crowd celebrated and the noise level lifted. After nine early fouls between the teams, Belghazouani became the first player booked in the 28th minute. Chafni brought down Serero and was booked. Furious, he remonstrated with the Gambian referee Bakary Papa Gassama. Replays suggested he might have had a case. Phala’s free kick curled just over the South African forwards, but it turned into a difficult save for Lamyaghri, who was forced to turn it around his post. The South Africa team’s nerves were on show early in the contest, but driven on by the home support, they improved as the match progressed and they were eventually rewarded with a hard-earned, entertaining 2-2 draw. However, they had to endure an up-and-down, roller-coaster ride of a contest before a late goal secured South Africa top spot in Group A of the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations (Afcon) and a place in the quarterfinals. After a strong team performance in their win over Angola, the expectations of Bafana Bafana’ supporters were high ahead of their last Group A match in Durban on Sunday night. Khumalo then needed to make a difficult clearance from a free kick swung into the six-yard box after Thuso Phala had committed a foul out on the Moroccans’ left flank. Morocco were back on top of the standings, South Africa down to second, Cape Verde up to third and Angola down to fourth. Final whistleFinally the whistle to end the match arrived. Igesund bounced onto the pitch, fists clenched, punching the air. Bafana Bafana were through. Hearts in mouthsThe hearts of the home fans were in their mouths, though, when Sangweni made a mistake at the back and Al Arabi raced through to challenge Khune. The goalkeeper rushed off his line and deflected the striker’s attempt at a chip with a fine effort to keep South Africa in the game. The Bafana Bafana players surrounded Igesund, making a circle, before breaking up to turn to the fans and signal their thanks for their support. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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